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  1. #11
    DutchShooter's Avatar
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    Actually, developing Rollei Retro 100 ("rebranded" APX-100) at box speed is very well possible in Rodinal, I wouldn't worry too much about that. I use 12.5 minutes at 20C and get perfect negatives (On a sunny day I shot a yellow wall which was in shade with Zone 0-X exposure and got great results). If I test a film or a shutter, I always use the same wall at my home, on a sunny day around noon when the wall is in shade, to minimize variability.

  2. #12

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    My experience with fomapan was that it was a very 'flat' film.
    art is about managing compromise

  3. #13
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Necator View Post
    Just out of curiosity. I have noticed that the development times (massive dev chart) for Fomapan 100 in Rodinal are a lot shorter than for e.g. Agfa APX100 or Ilford FP+. Are films really that different? For APX100, the development time is almost twice as the one for Fomapan 100.
    It could be that the Fomapan is a film made with less hardened gelatin relative to the other more modern yet still traditional (i.e. non-tabular) silver films.

    Hardened gelatin offers a much slower expansion and diffusion rate to the devloping agent when the developer is poured over the film.

    Hardened gelatines on the other hand are much more resistant to protecting the image forming silver from damage, or being harmed by higher temperature development.
    my real name, imagine that.

  4. #14
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by avandesande View Post
    My experience with fomapan was that it was a very 'flat' film.
    Please, explain. Fomapan 200 is highly valued by alt process printers who need a film that can produce significant contrast. I have no problem with getting proper contrast and density off my negatives to yield excellent platinum and gum bichromate prints, and salt, albumen and carbon are not out of the question either. This is accomplished with "expansion" development (i.e. extending the development time without changing the exposure). If you are finding the film to be too "flat", then perhaps you should change your development time.

  5. #15
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by avandesande View Post
    My experience with fomapan was that it was a very 'flat' film.
    All films are 'flat', or 'contrasty', depending upon how you develop them.

  6. #16
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wilde View Post
    It could be that the Fomapan is a film made with less hardened gelatin relative to the other more modern yet still traditional (i.e. non-tabular) silver films.

    Hardened gelatin offers a much slower expansion and diffusion rate to the devloping agent when the developer is poured over the film.

    Hardened gelatines on the other hand are much more resistant to protecting the image forming silver from damage, or being harmed by higher temperature development.
    By your hypothesis, then, Fomapan should have more contrast, not less, as from your explanation we deduce that the more hardened gelatin in other films will impede development.

  7. #17
    Necator's Avatar
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    I just love shooting film, and love this site :-) . I started out by wondering how I could increase contrast on my negatives, and before I know it, I'm learning about the Zone System, reading Wikipedia articles on film development and silver halides to understand the differences between expansion and push processing. I was able to put the pieces together, although it did not prevent me from dreaming about Zone systems and development the whole night :-)

  8. #18
    DutchShooter's Avatar
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    Necator, I can happily advice the book "The Negative" from Ansel Adams. It helped me tremendously last year when I started up developing my own B&W negs, made me understand things much better

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