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  1. #41

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    "the timer les refers to seems quite expensive and needs to be imported from the uk. i'll give it a go using the new lpl digital timer i just got. after i win the lottery i'll get the dedicated timer."


    If you are handy building electronic kits, here is a link to a discussion here on a F-stop timer kit (about $100US).

    I built the kit and it works very well, has some nice features including a test strip mode. I had just starting doing things in f-stops using a chart and this is much easier.

    http://www.apug.org/site/main/viewtopic.php?t=3136

    In reference to the microwave - I remember seeing a documentary film about Ansel Adams. He tore an 11X14 test print in half and used the microwave to dry. I have never tried it but it seems like a good idea --as long as my wife won't mind

    Regards,
    John



    [/quote]

  2. #42
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    Just wanted to put in a plug for the method Dave mentioned of avoiding drydown by preventing shrinkage. He was kind enough to send me the how-to, and I've been converted. I tried it on Bergger fiber matte, Bergger fiber glossy, and Ilford Gallerie. The drydown, best as I can estimate it, was 0%, 0%, and maybe 1%, respectively. This is one of the test print, no scanning adjustments, and it looks exactly like it did wet.

    Thanks, Dave.



    - CJ

  3. #43

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    Please share! Is it more involved than the standard taping to glass and cutting away once dry?
    Thanks --
    Jeanne

    (lovely print Cheryl!)

  4. #44

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    I use RC paper a lot more often than I do fiber based paper and, my experience indicateds that RC paper will exhibit some dry down effect, though less than that of fiber based papers. So while the base doesn't swell, the emulsion surely must, however slightly, for this effect to be noticed. It is very subtle. I noticed it only when I tried to print a shot that I'd made with too much flash. While the print was still wet the faces had no texture at all, but the next morning there was some detail in those areas of the print. It's still a lousy photograph, but it did show me approximately quantify the dry down effect with this particular paper.

  5. #45

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    First post here... Hello everyone.

    Regarding dry-down: From my experience dry-down is something which occurs at different rates for different papers. In general I have noted less dry down with a matt or semi matte surface (like MCP 118) than I have found with glossy (such as MCP 111). This seems to be consistant behaviour (again IMO) to other papers with different paper brands depending on whether the paper is semi matte or gloss. In the case of a paper like MCP 118 sometimes it is easy to judge the final print because there is less dry-down to the point where I can safely say there will be minimal dry-down, and from memory--this is often the case.

  6. #46
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    I am new to this forum and a little nervous about participating because it appears there are established roles such as resident experts. However, at the risk of making a fool of myself I will try a reply. First of all, I think "you all" are making too much of a very simple subject. All papers dry down (some more than others). There is a simple way to handle dry down if you do some up front work. Start by making a correctly exposed (i.e. to your eye) print. Leave it wet. Then, make a series of prints 2% less exposure, 4% less exposure, 6% less exposure, 8% less, 10% less, 12% less, and 14% less. Then, dry each of the test exposures. (use a microwave if you want to get them done quickly). Then, match the one that looks like the print that you have kept wet. Voila, you have found the dry down index for that paper. I did this test with Ilford Gallerie and for my purposes, I have found an 8% dry down factor on Both Grades 1 & 2. If you use VC paper, just think, you only have to do this once. I have used this for several years and it is dead accurate. Periodically, I will test a new pack of paper. Now, if you change paper manufacturers, you have to do the test again... I am fortunate enough to have a Zone VI cold light stabilizer. When I make my best wet print (which becomes my pilot) I dial in 8% on the dry down meter and I can make 100 prints from the same paper and print 1 and 99 look exactly alike. Calumet Zone VI also has a dry down meter on its cold light timer. If you don't have these tools, the tests + a calculator works fine. To me that is all that needs to be known about dry down. By the way, if you believe "AZO" doesn't dry down, do this test, you'll verify it. Bottom Line: who cares whether papers shrink or not if you can make consistently good exposures?
    Often wrong, but never in doubt!

  7. #47
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    who cares whether papers shrink or not if you can make consistently good exposures?
    Um, I do. Because by preventing shrinkage, I can also prevent the 'curly print' problem while I eliminate drydown. And I can do it without having to do a bunch of tests. Makes sense to me.

  8. #48
    esanford's Avatar
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    I knew this post was going to get me into trouble. Having said that, I completed the test once, my framer solves my "curly print problem" while I dance in the woods like an elf with my camera.
    Often wrong, but never in doubt!

  9. #49
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    Heh heh. Nope, you'll have to try harder than that to get in trouble! LOL. I don't use a framer, so I have to deal with the damn scrolled-up print myself. I love Bergger papers, but I've found them to be the worst offenders. If I don't tape it down to dry, I have to drag all my curly prints to a local darkroom to use their drymount press (I don't have one) and press them, trying to avoid creasing the corners in the process, and then bring them home and weight them so they don't curl back up. What a pain! So, the taping-down-the-print method is perfect for me.

  10. #50
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    esanford,
    Welcome to the group. There are people here with a wide variety of backgrounds, interests and expertise. This variety of contributors is what makes APUG such a great resource. I hope that you will contribute your own experience and opinions.

    Les is highly regarded as a Printer, Teacher and Writer but the reason that I addressed him specifically in the thread title was because I was referencing a post that he had made in a previous thread which I could not manage to locate.

    Your method of dealing with drydown is almost identical to the method that Les describes in his book. I haven't been this formal about dealing with drydown yet but I would probably benefit from it and will try it soon.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

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