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Thread: RC-V-FB

  1. #31
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Miller
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    Quote Originally Posted by Ka
    Can one achieve the depth of Fibre on RC? Can one archivally tone RC with Selenium or Sistan?
    As for "depth" - I would not have a clue.
    The way that I would measure the depth of a paper would be to expose the paper to a 21 step Stouffer tablet....
    That I can do.

    That really wasn't *my* definition of "depth", though. I see "depth" as the impression of including a third dimension. The most striking example of this that I've seen is in a collage of prints done on Ilford's "portfolio", printed from IR (Konica 750) negatives. These give a definite impression of a "stereoscopic" image - without the viewer. I've contemplated and studied these for some time now ... I'm still not sure *why*.

    But ... having the different densities falling close to where they *should* be --- uh ... "Tonal Fidelity"?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Miller
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    Quote Originally Posted by Ka
    Can one achieve the depth of Fibre on RC? Can one archivally tone RC with Selenium or Sistan?
    As for "depth" - I would not have a clue.
    The way that I would measure the depth of a paper would be to expose the paper to a 21 step Stouffer tablet....
    That I can do.

    That really wasn't *my* definition of "depth", though. I see "depth" as the impression of including a third dimension. The most striking example of this that I've seen is in a collage of prints done on Ilford's "portfolio", printed from IR (Konica 750) negatives. These give a definite impression of a "stereoscopic" image - without the viewer. I've contemplated and studied these for some time now ... I'm still not sure *why*.

    But ... having the different densities falling close to where they *should* be --- uh ... "Tonal Fidelity"?
    I think that a given paper in which either the paper characteristics are such that it has a long straight line characteristic with abreviated toe and shoulder, or the photographer has tested the paper and then tailored the camera negative accordingly. Either of these conditions will give the result that you describe. This occurs, in my experience, with the papers that I mentioned earlier. It is my observation that very few people take the time to determine paper characteristics. That requires determining reflection densities of the paper in the manner that I suggested. Hence it seems that they are hard put to utilize the potential of the material. Have you tested the papers that you use by determining the reflection densities and corresponding exposure curve?

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