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Thread: First chemicals

  1. #11

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    If you're worried about losing precious images, then do test rolls of something unimportant before. Test rolls are always advised when trying something new.

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    ryca:

    You need not worry about re-doing the Stop-bath steps. I can guarantee that development has stopped for all of the films and prints you have done.

    As far as re-doing the Fix steps, you probably shouldn't bother. The prints with stains are probably incompletely fixed, but re-fixing will probably not help. If there are any films that were fixed toward the end, you might want to consider re-fixing them, but I wouldn't bother, unless there are absolutely critical images on them, that could never be replaced. If you do re-fix and wash, the extra handling will increase the chance of scratches or other damage.

    Most likely all but the last prints will be fine.

    Just consider it an opportunity to learn (there will be lots more ).

    Keep having fun!

    Matt

    Quote Originally Posted by ryca View Post
    Hi All,

    I think I've messed up - You all mention keeping film & paper 'stop' & 'fix' mixtures seperate... I'm somewhat a newbie - been doing this at home for the past 3 weeks and have been using the same stop & fixture for both my film processing & wet paper printing as the ratio specified was the same on each bottle --> Ilfostop (1+19) & Ilford Hypam Fixer (1+4). My results have been fine though?

    Should I continue or redo 4 new batches? (2 x Stop & 2 x Fixer)

    Also on a side note.. I've been reusing the stop & fixer for these 3 weeks.. mixed them each into a 1lt bottle. I only work on weekends and have processed around 4 films and made about 15-20 prints. How do i know that the stop & fixer has expired / exhausted / ended?? Does Ilfostop or Hypam indicate? Is there a max number you all adhere to? I noticed on 2 prints I made last night had some kind of stains on them, not in the same location either.


    thanks!

  3. #13
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryca View Post
    Hi All,

    I think I've messed up - You all mention keeping film & paper 'stop' & 'fix' mixtures seperate... I'm somewhat a newbie - been doing this at home for the past 3 weeks and have been using the same stop & fixture for both my film processing & wet paper printing as the ratio specified was the same on each bottle --> Ilfostop (1+19) & Ilford Hypam Fixer (1+4). My results have been fine though?

    Should I continue or redo 4 new batches? (2 x Stop & 2 x Fixer)

    Also on a side note.. I've been reusing the stop & fixer for these 3 weeks.. mixed them each into a 1lt bottle. I only work on weekends and have processed around 4 films and made about 15-20 prints. How do i know that the stop & fixer has expired / exhausted / ended?? Does Ilfostop or Hypam indicate? Is there a max number you all adhere to? I noticed on 2 prints I made last night had some kind of stains on them, not in the same location either.


    thanks!
    Yup – sounds like you have messed up – but not big time – so the stuff you have done should be OK

    Probably the best thing to do is dump the Fix Sol’n you have made up and make up two new batches – one for film at 1+4 and the other for Paper at either 1+4 or 1+9.

    The Paper Fix at 1+4 is faster acting, which is important if you are using FB Paper but of no real consequence if you are using RC – check the Ilford Web Site - http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/...0213591255.pdf

    Capacity/Exhaustion of Fix is difficult to determine without laboratory testing.
    Manufacturers capacity figures are safe – stick with them and you will never have to worry.
    Go beyond these and you are on your own – so as Dirty Harry said “Do you feel lucky: Punk!”
    Personally, to me Fix is cheap as chips – so if in doubt I chuck it and start with fresh.
    One of the better ways to keep a tally on the capacity is to keep score on the side of the bottle – see here - http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/6...den-rules.html

    Stop is just Stop – it doesn’t real matter whether it’s being used for Film or Paper – so you should be fine there.
    Watch the colour – Ilfostop has a colour indicator, which is a clear golden yellow when fresh but goes a rather muddy yellow colour as it exhausts before finally turning purple when exhaustion is complete.
    It’s best to dump it as it starts to turn muddy yellow and not to wait for it to turn purple.
    By the time it has turned purple it is no longer acidic but alkali and so isn’t Stop any longer.

    Stains on prints are never a good sign :o
    It usually shows either exhaustion or contamination or mechanical damage to the print surface.
    The best thing to when you see it, is to dump ALL of the working chemistry, give all the trays and dishes a good clean then start again.

    Good luck

    Martin

  4. #14
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    Thanks alot for the advice, I will sure read these posts over and over again.
    D76 is indeed cheaper, so I will get that one instead of ID-11.

    I've also found a nice second hand-unopened 5ltr box of Amaloco 6006 which I'm currently bidding on
    (New: €44,50 Second hand: €15 )

  5. #15

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    D-76 1:3

    Quote Originally Posted by JBoontje View Post
    Thanks alot for the advice, I will sure read these
    posts over and over again. D76 is indeed cheaper,
    so I will get that one instead of ID-11.
    Even cheaper at 1:3, a not unusual dilution. Good
    I'm sure at even greater dilutions. Development
    times do become extended. Dan

  6. #16

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    @alexmacphee, @MattKing & @Martin Aislabie:

    thanks so much for taking the time to reply.. your advice is invaluble! i'll continue sharing Stop but will definitely mix up 2 new seperate Fix batches for film & prints and as advised, keep tabs on usage as per Ilfords recommendations.

    my storage bottles are only 1lt and each usage (whether film or print) is with approx 600ml - this isn't a problem is it? should I store working solution in bigger bottles (eg. 2lt or 5lt) so theres more volume to work & refresh itself with?

    again thanks!

  7. #17
    alexmacphee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryca View Post
    my storage bottles are only 1lt and each usage (whether film or print) is with approx 600ml - this isn't a problem is it? should I store working solution in bigger bottles (eg. 2lt or 5lt) so theres more volume to work & refresh itself with?
    I don't know if you get it where you live, or get indigestion for that matter, but my wife has a duodenal ulcer which occasionally gives her cause to reach for a bottle of Gaviscon, an indigestion remedy from the pharmacy. One of the sizes it comes in is 600ml, which is perfect. I use D76 at 1+1, which is use-once throw-away dilution. I clean out the medicine bottles thoroughly, and use them to store my stock D76 and my fix. The 600ml bottles come in two shapes (I think it's for the different flavours), so I use one shape for dev and the other shape for fix, just to avoid risk of confusion. There are also 300ml size bottles of the stuff.

    I make up my D76 stock, then dispense it into the 600 and 300 bottles. This scheme works perfectly for me. D76 stores well, and when I'm ready to use it, I dilute it 1+1 in the measuring cylinder ready for pouring in to the tank. I like glass bottles because I find them better for temperature equilibrating in a water bath. The caps on these bottles are also child-proof, which I like for photo solutions.
    Alex

  8. #18
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=ryca;876796my storage bottles are only 1lt and each usage (whether film or print) is with approx 600ml - this isn't a problem is it? should I store working solution in bigger bottles (eg. 2lt or 5lt) so theres more volume to work & refresh itself with?

    again thanks![/QUOTE]

    You will be fine as you are

    Martin

  9. #19
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    Hello JBoontje,
    You are getting much good, sound advice. My advice is to internalize this good information while at the same time, trying to keep things simple. As has been mentioned, your goal is consistency in technique and in result. D76/ID-11 and Tri-X and a "classic" combination: learn it completely.
    And, most importantly, have fun.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    D76/ID-11 and Tri-X and a "classic" combination: learn it completely.
    Sometimes even the most obvious advice bears repetition. I always fall back on HP5/D76 (for some reason D76 is cheaper than ID11), which I've used since it was HP3. It's always interesting to experiment, but when you know one combination inside out, you're far less likely to be wrong-footed. It's closely analogous to knowing your camera so intimately you're unaware of having to think about it.
    Alex

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