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Thread: Film grain

  1. #1

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    I am trying to make a series of pictures with very prominent grain.I,m sure I have read a similar post here before, but I'll be dammed if I can find it now!
    So if you could indulge be again!

    So far the best results I have achieved have been using TMAX 3200 (35mm)developed in Ilford Multigrade paper dev mixed 1-20 for 9 mins. I was pleasantly suprised by the results! Large but very sharp grain, which looked fantastic in a 10x8 print.

    However I am sure there is a whole bunch of you out there that have a load more suggestions!

  2. #2

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    Develop in Rodinal 1:200 for a two hours, and you'll have all the grain you can shake a monopod at.
    "Hey, I don't tell you how to tell me what to do, so don't tell me how to do what you tell me to do!"-Bender Bending Rodriguez

  3. #3
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    TriX rated at 1600 ISO stand developed for 5 or 6 hours in ID11 or D76 diluted 1 to 40. You'll get very sharp grain.

    Ilford 3200 rated at 6400 developed in Rodinal 1 to 50 for 14 minutes.

  4. #4
    gma
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    I am glad to hear that someone using this site wants to accentuate grain for artistic purposes. I recommend Tri-X rated 800 or 1200 and developed in Dektol diluted as for paper development. You will need to experiment with times. Also a temperature range of 75-80 degrees F will help enlarge grain to some extent. Back in the '60s grain was trendy, but now that most people are accustomed to the T grain emulsions, they work hard to avoid any appearance of grain. If film did not have any grain you would not have a picture at all. I say you should embrace the technology you prefer and make the best artistic use of whichever type film you prefer. Amen!

    gma

  5. #5

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    OK Guys, I read veriwide's reply and thought he was taking the p**s, but now I have read Les's reply I am not so sure! But considering its past April 1ST I am willing the believe you.

    Surely having the film in the dev for that amount of time makes the emulsion very soft? Isn't there a good chance of washing some if not all of it away?

    GMA, as far as I am concerned grain is an inherent part of the materials we us, why not promote it?

    Does anyone know a way to simulate digital noise with film?



    only kidding!

  6. #6
    gma
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    Another thought. You can produce reticulation (a crackled emulsion) by using a hot developer ( 100 degrees F ) then dousing in a cold water bath before fixing. You will need to experiment with this tactic also. As I recall Tri-X can tolerate some real abuse without coming off the base. Some films will slide right off the base if you try this.

    gma

  7. #7
    bmac's Avatar
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    My idea of prominent grain is Tri-X in Rodinal 1+25. Sharp defined grain, but not the blotchy grain on Tmax 3200.
    hi!

  8. #8
    gma
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    A correction on the reticulation process. All in total darkness of course. According to a Kodak manual: For Plus-X or Tri-X Use normal development time and temp in D 76, Acid stop bath at 140-150 degrees F for 1 min, Wash in cold water below 40 degrees F for 1 min. to crackle the emulsion. Then fix and wash normally. To emphasize the effect even more after the stop bath and cold dip immerse into 180-190 degree F water then into cold again before the fixer.

    gma

  9. #9
    Ole
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    Also underdeveloping and printing at a higher contrast - ideally with point source or condenser enlarger - will make the grain "grittier".

    The only time I've had visible grain on a contact print was when I developed in monobath process. Something about the thiosulfate dissolving and replating the grains, perhaps? But it's a chancy procedure that takes a lot of experimentation to find the optimum composition for each film / purpose.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  10. #10

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    HP5+ in Rodinal 1+50 /20º for 17 min gived me nice grain. Fast visual identification of grain but not excessively prominent, IMO.
    Francisco Duarte

    Laranjeiro, Portugal



 

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