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  1. #1
    david b's Avatar
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    Can anyone confirm this? I just read this on photo.net and not sure I believe it.

    I am waiting for a return call from Agfa USA and will let everyone know once I speak to them.

  2. #2
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    I gave up on AGFA after they lied to me about the disco of APX 100 in 4x5. To bad, it's great film.
    www.ericrose.com
    yourbaddog.com

    "civility is not a sign of weakness" JFK

    "The Dude abides" - the Dude

  3. #3
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    I just got off the phone with the Canadian distributor for AGFA films - Amplis Photo. Phil Nelson says the only film he has heard that has been recently disco'd is some 220 color product. He mentioned they sell LOTS of 120 B&W and can't see that being dropped anytime soon. But of course this is the same guy that told me he hadn't heard of the 4x5 APX100 being disco'd until it was to late for me to get any.

    Take it for what it's worth.
    www.ericrose.com
    yourbaddog.com

    "civility is not a sign of weakness" JFK

    "The Dude abides" - the Dude

  4. #4
    david b's Avatar
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    This is from AGFA UK:

    Dear Mr. B,

    Thank you for your e-mail.

    Medium format films are currently under review by many manufacturers including Agfa but we have made no decision to discontinue it. The vast
    majority of 120 film has traditionally been bought by professionals but it is also this market that is turning most rapidly to digital technology.
    There is no denying that 120 sales are declining.

    Taking these market trends into account we will be examining the situation very closely to determine future manufacturing capacity. Should we take
    a decision to discontinue 120 format, a proper announcement will be made in the Photographic press.

    I hope this information is of help.

    Regards,
    Philip Miller
    Corporate Communications Manager
    Agfa UK

  5. #5
    Leon's Avatar
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    that doesnt sound good .... damn the digi, damn the digi.

  6. #6

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    damn the digi leon...
    im pro too - have no meaning to go digi and want agfa film and paper in my arsenal.
    anyway - lets start studing the maco products more and more, cause some of them are very similar to the agfa.
    victor

  7. #7
    blansky's Avatar
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    Not wanting to be a doomsdayer, I mentioned this in the "end of analog" thread.

    With the proliferation of digital in the professional disciplines of photography, it is going to have dire consequences for the analog users.

    The costs for Kodak etc to produce chemistry, films and papers is probably astronomical considering the EPA concerns. Add to this the fact that instead of selling millions of rolls of film to professionals, to now just selling thousands of rolls to die hards it seems this phenomena of products being discontinued is going to continue.

    Granted, boutique suppliers will continue to support us, but there is little doubt that the choices we not have will begin to diminish.

    I'm sure that people think that we are some sort of a large market but compared to the pros that are going digital we are a very small group. When I ran my comparitively small studio twenty years ago I used about 70 to 100 rolls a week. Multiply that by a few hundred thousand studios and you can see the number of rolls that are now, NOT being purchased. Add in product, fashion and photojournalism and the writing is on the wall.

    Michael McBlane

  8. #8

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    It only confirms what I have been saying for awhile now. Those film products geared to professionals will be the first to go. First MF film, then I suspect we have probably seen the last of new MF cameras to be designed.
    I can't see mfgs sinking money into a market that was almost entirely geared towards professionals that now shoot dgital.

    Next will come the reduction in LF film. I still believe that this will continue to be a viable market into the future, although with a much limited selection of film from niche suppliers. It appears to me that any professional who still uses a LF camera and film does so by choice, probably in addition to digital. We also have the current increasing art and hobbyist market in LF and ULF and maybe some of the MF hobbyists will make the shift to LF as prices for used cameras, lenses and enlargers continue to go down. The internet will continue to fuel the new renaissance in alternative processes that many want a LF camera for, and some of those individuals will also shoot film.

    The positive is that three or four years from now may be the ideal time to get into MF if someone keeps producing film. Older Hassys with a lens will be selling like old Calumet C-400s, today at about $150-$200.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  9. #9
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    I cannot help but wonder about the assumption that the entire body of "Professionals" are massively, and without exception, "going digital". For the small studio dedicated to the best *quality* - price efficiency, IMHO, film is nothing like dead. Yeah - right- the High end digitals are "just as good as film" - but at what price? A top shelf Phase 1 or Leaf or -- backs are *still* in the US$10,000 to US$25,000 price range ... with a probable life of 1 to 2 years ... that is only for the back. The humongous computer - and the printer and the software are additional - all to get equal with film.

    Check out the latest "Professional Photographer" magazine - I have April 2004 - *NO* ads for Digital Backs . none. There is a display ad for the entire Sinar Digital line.
    Leaf does have the back cover, advertising an "Integrated Medium Format" camera - the Leaf-Mamiya "Pro Digital . for only $6999. That is the first Leaf ad in the last two issues. There is an ad for the Mamiya 645 AFD - a NEW camera with **both** optional digital AND film backs.
    Hmm... last page - "Fresh Perspectives ... two images captured on Fuji Provia 100F film and combined in Photoshop. That is what I see the local small studios around here doing - capturing on *film* and manipulating after the fact digitally.

    In browsing around I checked out Calumet ... Interesting to note the film - chemical paper products available from Fuji - including direct positive papers.

    I wonder how much of this "Digital Revolution" is really a true fact, and how much of it is -- dare I suggest it? -- Advertising Hype.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  10. #10
    blansky's Avatar
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    And in "Rangefinder" the other magazine bought by most portrait studios virtually every ad that dealt with equipment or labs was digital. Along with that most of the articles were about digital.

    Added to that just about every speaker at the conventions is pushing digital. Of 50 speakers, 40 are talking digital. Granted a lot are being paid by the manufacturers but digital has saturated the portrait environment. Same for the wedding environment, which is shooting a lot with 35mm style cameras, because they usually don't enlarge much more than 8x10.

    Agreed that the "capture" medium may still be film but from there going to digital for retouching, proofing and prints doesn't take much imagination that when the digital cameras or backs drop a bit in price, the writing is on the wall.

    I'm not happy about this, I'm merely stating the obvious.


    Michael

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