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  1. #1
    chef_IBK's Avatar
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    Push process a Neopan 400 to 1600.

    Should I have to meter my ligth at 400 then process or set my ligth meter to 1600 asa for the shooting? I use Iflord Pq Uni developer is 1+9 and Ilford Rapid fixer 1+4. Film is 120.My average darkoom teperature is around 21.3°C =70.34°F .Chemicals are just new! Set up with a chair and a white background and a small ligth from top metered at 400 asa 1/15 shutter speed is f 2.8 and at 1600 asa 1/60 shutter f2.8 with a Minolta autometer III F. If I want to set my hassy at f 5.6 and 1/125 for the shot then push it to 1600 that means I have to shoot 2 t-stops lower. Or just set up my f at 5.6 and 125 shutter and then push it to 1600 in dev.
    Ciao
    Last edited by chef_IBK; 12-16-2009 at 11:06 AM. Click to view previous post history.
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  2. #2
    Tony Egan's Avatar
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    What are you hoping to achieve? Neopan is quite a contrasty film at 400 already with less shadow detail than most other 400 films I've used. Pushing it to 1600 and overdeveloping will get you very contrasty negs with very little shadow detail. May suit what you are trying to do if it is a very low contrast subject.

    Pushing usually means giving the film less light than recommended by the "box speed" and then developing it for a longer time to push the highlights closer to "normal". So yes, it normally means 2-stops lower (2x less time, 2 stops smaller aperture (larger f-stop number) according to a meter set at 400. Or you could change the meter to 1600 ISO and just use those settings if you are metering for "average" incident light. Then again you could bracket down one, two or three stops and use the result that best meets your vision.

  3. #3
    chef_IBK's Avatar
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    So basically you mean that 1600 is too much should I just push it to 800 then...yeah cause I could not find any match with the developer and the Neopan film in dev times... so I dont even know how much are the normal dev times ..Still a lil bummed cause is my favourite film ever...!!!
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  4. #4
    mablo's Avatar
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    My recipe for Neopan 400@1600 is D-76 stock, 24C for 9 minutes. It's quite okay but you loose shadow details.

  5. #5

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    Neopan 1600 is one of my favorite films (I don't find it too contrasty at all) and I've heard a few people say that Neopan 400 pushed to 1600 isn't too different from it. I haven't tried it in 35mm since I have plenty of 1600, but am planning to buy some 400 in 120 this weekend to test that theory. Would love another option for high-speed b/w in 120.

  6. #6
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Agree with the question Tony Egan is posing. What are you trying to achieve? A certain look? Shooting in low light? What is it about the situation you are photographing in that requires you to underexpose your film by two stops?

    That will help in finding a good solution.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #7

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    hallo

    emofin should work very good
    --------------------------------------------------
    vfdkv (259)

  8. #8
    chef_IBK's Avatar
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    Hi and thanks for the answers!!! I just wanted to shoot yeah in low ligth and push process it.. And develop with the chemicals I have...But I really could not find any charts even on digitaltruth matching Ilford pq and neopan and any push process dev time...!!! I will just go for 1t stop push then...
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  9. #9

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    I was really puzzled by your developer in the initial post but ignored it, but now that you mention it again, I'm just curious...isn't that a paper developer? I realize the MDC also gives times for developing film in Dektol but maybe there's a reason there's no published times for Ilford PQ?

  10. #10

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    Oh wait, I see it on there. Maybe you can try this to find your pushing times:

    http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.php?doc=pushproc

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