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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deckled Edge
    The fascination with development by inspection completely eludes me. I can take two negatives on the light box and study them under a 10x loupe for two minutes, and still cannot decide which will print best with the #2 filter. How can anyone look at a wet negative for a few milliseconds under green light, or a few seconds with an infrared set-up and determine a good highlight or a strong shadow?
    For me that would be like disconnecting your speedometer and determining your speed by licking your hand and using the cool sensation when you hang it out of the window.
    We dunk our work at 68 F., not "feels right to me"; we time our exposures, not "that oughtta do it"; we develop good habits and repeat them exactly every time to eliminate unwanted variables. Anything else would be jumping the tracks and off-roading with a locomotive.

    OK, development inspectors. Bring it on! :-)
    I was fascinated with the romantic notion of doing what Edward Weston did. You have to admit there is a certain mystique to that...something inside said yeah!!! if I do what he did then I undoubtedly will make prints like Edward.

    I found out that, in my experience, I can not tell within 15 units the density range of a negative when I have more then a minute in full room light to judge let alone 3-5 seconds under a dim green light. But then maybe it is that my eyes and judgement are fading with my age.

    In order to get the most out of the materials we use, I believe that we need to determine the characteristics of those materials and then formulate repeatable procedures to produce results consistant with the characteristics of the materials.

    So as a recovering DBI addict. I take it one day at a time and do the same thing over and over again. That means reading negative densities on a densitometer to match the paper.

  2. #12
    Sean's Avatar
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    But I'm not talking about a quick glance in the dark here. I'm talking about full and bright illumination of the negative and looking at it in crystal clarity, in total darkness while it develops. Imagine if you could watch your neg develop on a lightbox in full light from start to finish -this is what infrared inspection can provide. This is totally unchartered territory for me, but if it works, and I can get a feel for this process, the rewards could be pretty phenominal. I also plan to take care during exposure, not just shooting blindly and worrying about it later. I figure I have nothing to loose here. If it doesn't work out I can sell the goggle to a hunter, and the IR lightsource to someone with a B&W security camera or camcorder. Not much risk here in trying something new so I'll give it a shot. I'm not aware of anyone attempting to create a bright 8x10 IR lightbox and deving on a glass tray above that with a goggle, watching the entire process. If anything it will be fun to try

  3. #13

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    Sean, I think that what you are attempting to do is a worthwhile project. My DBI experiences were certainly a lot different then what you are doing. As you said it will be fun. Good luck and I look forward to hearing your experiences.

  4. #14

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    After your eyes adjust to the dark, the green light used in DBI is very bright. The infrared source should not cause you any difficulties.

    By the way, the negs and prints I promised you a long time ago are going out tonight. Hope you can still use them!

  5. #15
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    The question here would be the wavelength of the light produced by the LEDs. If it *is* Infra red, greater than ~ 700 nanometers, the Tri-X should be blind to it - or at least it would take a *very* long time to affect it. LEDs, as a rule, are very "monochromatic" I have the JOBO MaxiLux safelight (? - Who pays attention to the names of things?) and that consists of a bunch of LEDs.
    Another factor would be the spectral sensitivity during development - I don't know if that would be different from the dry film or not.

    Only one way to go - try it. Leave some wet film under it for an extended time, and see what happens.

    BTW, was that power supply labeled in the Province of Dyslexia?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  6. #16
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    In order for your plan to work, the film will have to be transparent to IR light. Maybe you should check that out before going to a lot of expense. You may wind up having to put the illumination on your side of the film.
    Gadget Gainer

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