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  1. #1
    Sean's Avatar
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    I'm still building my infrared night vision develop by inspection system for tri-x 8x10.

    I have the goggle which can see infrared light. The idea is to develop each sheet in a glass tray with an infrared light source below the tray aiming up at the film. The result would be like looking at the film on a light table through the goggle. If it works as expected I should be able to see every nuance in the film as it develops. I have found what appears to be a good infrared light source, it contains a small bank of infrared led's. The guy on ebay says it gives off no visible light unless you look directly into the led you can see a very faint red glow within the leds. Is that faint glow going to be enough to fog the film or will the film even see it? I'm hoping it will not see it. I don't plan to leave the infrared light source on the entire time, just at certain intervals. The only way to answer this may be to do a fog test of some kind...

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    It should be okay, but if you know the specs of the IR source, you can check it against the spectral sensitivity curve for Tri-X in the technical data sheet at kodak.com.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #3
    Sean's Avatar
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    The guy doesn't know. I might just risk it and give it a try. If it doesn't work with that source I can sell it as a 'camcorder night illuminator', then get someone to custom built an IR source with specific specs.

  4. #4
    Sean's Avatar
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    This is the one I'm looking at. It's even waterproof which will come in handy incase I spill some chem on it by accident.


  5. #5
    Sean's Avatar
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    ah, i found a similar item with a wavelength of Wavelength: 945nM

    will check kodak's site

  6. #6
    Sean's Avatar
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    ok this is the sensitivity chart. So it looks like 945nm would be way in the clear right? not sure how to read this, thanks!


  7. #7

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    To be sure, I would contact Kodak.

  8. #8
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    That's right. 950nm would be way off the chart, so it would produce essentially no density on the neg.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #9
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Of course you could still do a fog test, or in the meantime, if you happen to have an deep red IR filter (which I suppose you might, since I remember that your Traveling Portfolio selections were IR), make a long exposure on Tri-X with that filter and see what shows up on the film.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #10

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    The fascination with development by inspection completely eludes me. I can take two negatives on the light box and study them under a 10x loupe for two minutes, and still cannot decide which will print best with the #2 filter. How can anyone look at a wet negative for a few milliseconds under green light, or a few seconds with an infrared set-up and determine a good highlight or a strong shadow?
    For me that would be like disconnecting your speedometer and determining your speed by licking your hand and using the cool sensation when you hang it out of the window.
    We dunk our work at 68 F., not "feels right to me"; we time our exposures, not "that oughtta do it"; we develop good habits and repeat them exactly every time to eliminate unwanted variables. Anything else would be jumping the tracks and off-roading with a locomotive.

    OK, development inspectors. Bring it on! :-)

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