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  1. #11

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    I disagree with Ian re the tonality of APX100 and Tmax 100. I do not like Tmax 100 one bit but loved APX 100! Tmax is much finer grained and will not respond the way APX did with rodinal or other acutance developers due to the extremely low grain and IMHO inherently poor acutance. APX was odd in that it went from smooth as a baby's botty in Xtol to crisp and hard in Rodinal in a much more polarised way than say Fp4+. Foma 100 is the same. Its great in rodinal and the grain also vanises in Xtol 1+something such that it ends up far finer grained in that brew than Fp4+.

    +/- with foma 100:

    QC can be iffy.
    thin and negs pop easily if you dont use double glass carrier
    35mm dries flat as a pancake
    120 on blue polyester base that curls like a party streamer.
    35mm dries with drying marks no matter what I do (I cannot get distilled water here), so I dry off the back with kitchen towel when I hang it and get perfect negs
    A bit slower than APX. I rate it about 1/3-1/2 stop slower than FP4+.
    If you were a rodinal user, I really would go for Foma 100 as a good match.

  2. #12
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I don't think TMX has anything to do with APX100, and neither does acros. I don't see the similarity it all, in fact I would consider them examples of how different two films could be. Foma and Plus-X are the closest I've come to replacing APX100, and the foma is quite slow.

    FWIW TMX is also a 50 speed film for me even though TMY is a good solid 400.
    f/22 and be there.

  3. #13
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  4. #14
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmo View Post
    Where did you find THAT in the datasheet...?
    On about the 3rd page of the original printed version that I've kept back in the UK.

    Ian

  5. #15
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bijesh View Post

    Because it's not available, in 120 and sheet film sizes. I switched to Tmax when Agfa dropped it in sheet film sizes

    Ian

  6. #16
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    I believe the Rollei Retro 80S is the "new" APX 100. You can get it in 120, 127 as well.

    http://macodirect.de/rollei-retro-c-1_6_56_479.html

  7. #17
    cmo
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninjarider View Post
    I believe the Rollei Retro 80S is the "new" APX 100. You can get it in 120, 127 as well.
    There is not the slightest similarity between APX 100 and the relabeled Agfa Aviphot 80 aerial film:

    #1: APX 100 has a normal base, Aviphot has a polyester base, e.g. it is mainly made for automatic machine processing. To make this more fun, Aviphot comes in two different thicknesses, 0.10mm or 0.06mm. Normal 35mm film has ca. 0.14mm, Tech Pan had 0.10mm. Let's hope the relabeling factory knows about the difference.

    #2: APX 100 has a normal, panchromatic emulsion and renders colors into black and white in a normal way. Aviphot 80 has a reduced sensitivity for blue and a higher sensitivity for red, and that creates a totally different image. And there is more:
    - Our lightmeters do not have the same spectral sensitivity, most of them are probably calibrated for normal films.
    - I could not even guess what happens by using filters because the exposure factor engraved on the filters will simply not fit.

    So, no matter what the marketing bla tells us, this film is NOT a child of APX 100, it's a distant relative.

  8. #18
    ninjarider's Avatar
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    cmo: Thanks, If I read the product info it confirms your "extra red" sensitivity:

    "Extended red sensitivity up to 750 nm, and therefore also capable for infrared photography."

    So, not a "normal" B&W film then...

  9. #19
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmo View Post
    #2: APX 100 has a normal, panchromatic emulsion and renders colors into black and white in a normal way. Aviphot 80 has a reduced sensitivity for blue and a higher sensitivity for red, and that creates a totally different image. And there is more:
    - Our lightmeters do not have the same spectral sensitivity, most of them are probably calibrated for normal films.
    - I could not even guess what happens by using filters because the exposure factor engraved on the filters will simply not fit.
    This "normal" is hard to define. If one looks at the the IlfordPhoto curves (wedge spectrograms though), the curve for the Kodak T-Max 400, or the Fuji Neopan Acros one will see reduced blue sensitivity too.

  10. #20
    cmo
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    Sure. But how strong is that? Their red sensitivity is normal, and they are somewhat normal films in all other respects.

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