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  1. #11

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    To my eye the streaking seems to uniform to be chemical----and this is the dead give-away to me--

    "The first four or so images are all on the outside ring of the reel, and they all show similar streaks."

    the second image I would write off to flair(lots of chrome...Yaahica Mat)

    Try a different tank.

    -Don

  2. #12
    cooltouch's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the responses, guys. I've always been rather gentle with my agitations after reading somewhere years ago that one should not be too aggressive. It appears, however, that you folks are recommending just the opposite.

    About five years ago, I got a wild urge to clean out my unused and seldom used photo gear and sold all my Patterson and Jobo tanks. Dumb thing to do. Sold my old Yankee tanks too. I bought this one and another just like it on eBay recently. Dunno how old it is, but it appears to be in a good state of repair.

    I'm inclined to take fschifano's advice, though, and get a decent tank that I can invert. Rapping one of these Yankees usually makes a mess, and I've always wondered if spinning was as good of a method of agitation as inverting. I need the plastic reels though. I'm right-handed, but am missing portions of three fingers on my right hand, so trying to get film onto an SS reel is a study in frustration.

    As for the possibility that it might have been a film loading issue, well I suppose. I was very careful making sure that all the slack was taken up prior to winding to the "start" mark. And I loaded and unloaded in open shade. Those light patches though may be indicating that I need to improve my technique in this area.

    The film was fresh, refrigerated 400TX, bought from my local camera shop just earlier last week. So it shouldn't be an issue with the film itself.

    I have another roll of the same stuff loaded in the camera right now. So I guess I'll go shoot it and see if I can improve my results this time.

  3. #13
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    I'd say that you might have a combination of TWO things...

    1. INSUFFICIENT agitation. I've found that if I constantly invert my tanks(stainless or Jobo) for the first 30s-1min of development, it usually takes care of mottling issues. I'm NOT a stand development guy(guess I'm too impatient :P), but when I first started out, I didn't agitate enough, and got marks similar to yours shown here. Simple answer: Go on ebay or craigslist, and get yourself a tank(Paterson w/ Rubber lids=fast pour-in/out times vs. stainless lids) and plop down $10-$15, probably less. Add a stainless reel or two(if you shoot 35mm as well), and you're set. Some People also use a water bath pre-soak before development, it helps to swell the emulsion, and I've found I have less mottling issues(none now), after using a stainless tank(Paterson) or Jobo tank, pouring quickly, and agitating for the first 30s. Some don't do the pre-soak, its up to you, doesn't hurt though to try on a roll or two.

    2. Loose roll in the camera. Being that I've never owned a yashicamat, although a friend of mine has. She stated that the first few rolls she put through the camera came out somewhat loose, and she got some edge fogging, no biggie, cause it didn't hit the negs, but still a problem at that. You might want to see if the tension on the take-up spool mechanism is nice and tight, with no slack.

    -Dan


    ohh... I start the timer when I've FINISHED pouring in the developer, and have agitated for 5-10s(out of the 1st 30sec). This is because the water still in the emulsion(from 1min pre-soak) needs to be swapped out for developer-laden water.


  4. #14

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    I'm also going w/ the theory of agitation issues. I've had similar things happen, though not as bad, and it was from agitation, namely lack there of. It's amazing how quickly things go south if the agitation is off, especially in the first 30sec to min. I find the moment I get sloppy or rush things or move from my exact system as far as how the developer moves around the film, then I'll have uneven voodoo show up.

    With that: two things that helped solve almost all of my agitation related problems, both of which have been mentioned here before: 1) don't pour the chemicals into the tank, find a closet or any place you can make totally dark, and lower the reels into the tank. Very slowly to avoid reel surge. 2) Leave substantial air space in the tank for chems to move around in. For instance, if you have a 4 reel tank, leave 1 or 2 of the reels empty and only cover the others w/ dev. I wish I'd been doing these things long long before, would have saved me some tough negs to print.

    Finally, you mentioned some relatively short dev times, not too short, but short enough to make uneven dev more pronounced (I actually just posted on having a similar problem, short times+active dev+no presoak=trouble). So maybe also take your d-76 1+1 or 1+2 to extend the times to more forgiving lengths.

    This might not fix anything though...always hard to say.

  5. #15
    whlogan's Avatar
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    Looks like Bromide Burnout to me. How do you agitate? If you are rotating the tank, stop at once! This is the #1 cause of burn out. Developing tanks should only be tipped side ways between 50 to 90 degrees either way (left or right) about 2 to 3 times a minute. More will increase your contrast. Want more? Use more. I have fought this problem for years and eveery time it was tank rotation that turned out to be the cause. trust me; I'm a Doctor!
    Logan

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffreyg View Post
    I have been using the same stainless steel tanks with occasional new lids for over thirty years with no problems. Yesterday I wanted to test a new old Hasselblad back that I recently received and quickly shot a roll of tmax 100 in my yard. I didn't care about the images and just developed in Ilford ID-11 1:1 at whatever the room temperature was for 14 min with only one agitation after pouring the developer in, water stop and rapid fix. The negatives were much to my surprise perfect although my interest was the mechanical and light seal properties of the back. And all these years I have been meticulous with technique - makes one wonder.
    Doesn't have much to do with the rest of this thread, but I honestly NEVER used to measure my temps (my room temp skews warm), am definitely loose by several seconds here or there on each end of development (as in, at the point I start the timer or exactly when I start dumping the chems out), up to 30 seconds of leeway if I'm feeling lazy and want to develop two different films together that are "close enough" in their times, frequently got distracted (since I'm at home with my phone, TV and computer) and missed an agitation or three. Yet I very rarely saw any frames that I thought were developed incorrectly, and I've been doing this for years. In the last couple months I've been experimenting with being more exact on times and temps and I have not noticed a difference.

    So uh...yeah, the few seconds the OP was off is definitely not causing this issue.

  7. #17
    tony lockerbie's Avatar
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    Almost certainly uneven development, caused by incorrect agitation. I use Patterson plastic tanks, and had the same problem from time to time, using the twirly thing to agitate. Never a problem with 35mm, only 120 roll. I now use inversion for all my processing in the Patterson tanks....problem gone! Not a bad idea to do a 1 minute pre-soak as well.
    The shutter on your Yashica will not cause that problem, can't imagine film loading is the problem either.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by cooltouch View Post
    I'm inclined to take fschifano's advice, though, and get a decent tank that I can invert. Rapping one of these Yankees usually makes a mess, and I've always wondered if spinning was as good of a method of agitation as inverting. I need the plastic reels though. I'm right-handed, but am missing portions of three fingers on my right hand, so trying to get film onto an SS reel is a study in frustration.


    Might I suggest this for your film processing? It's a plastic tank and it is incredibly easy to load...should not be a problem at all for you with your particular finger situation. I've been using it for a decent number of years now without a single problem - it's very well made. Liquid movement seems to be rather efficient too, as I've never had a problem with uneven development (even on my first roll of 120 film, which I just processed several days ago).

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