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  1. #1
    cdowell's Avatar
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    Rodinal & 320TXP?

    I just picked up a bottle of Rodinal at the camera store and am looking forward to giving it a try. Previously, I have only developed with Ilfosol S, DD-X and Kodak T-Max, with Ilfosol being my standard. I found T-Max to be kind of finicky.

    Lots of attractive grain is one of the things I've admired about Rodinal negatives, so I'm not worried about that at all.

    I've got a few 5-packs of Tri-X 320 around and thought I'd try the Rodinal with that, since I haven't had much luck with T-Max and only use one-shot developers. Anybody else using that combo?

    Looks like the BigDevChart says: Tri-X 320 & Rodinal, 1+50, 15 mins, 20C. Sound about right?

    For what it's worth, I'm using the 320 indoors, MF, with a strobe flash and softbox. I was pretty impressed with the first roll I shot last night (even developed in Ilfosol). Seemed to hold the skin tones pretty well. I actually ordered the film years ago by mistakes thinking it was normal Tri-X, because, yes, I am a genius

  2. #2
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    Sure, it'll work. You could also dilute less for shorter dev times or more for longer times.

  3. #3
    Rolleiflexible's Avatar
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    I've shot tons of TXP320 sheets and I process them
    always in Rodinal. My recipe: Expose at EI 160,
    prewash, process in Jobo tanks with 1:25 Rodinal
    @ 20C for about 8 minutes. Works like a charm.

  4. #4
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    I know it will be diverting the topic but...I wouldn't have thought to expose a relatively-fast film quite that low..I'm assuming to lower contrast a bit or gain shadow detail?
    I ask because I have seen your work in the past and greatly admire it.

  5. #5
    cdowell's Avatar
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    Divert away. I, too, looked at Sanders' work and was blown away. I'm interested to hear anything anyone has to say about not 'fearing the grain' and letting it give B&W such depth and body.

  6. #6
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    I'm not so sure Rodinal is a grainy developer, per se...acutance and sharpness, yeah. I have a good buddy who is wise in the ways of silver who LOVES Rodinal in regular Tri-X.

  7. #7
    Rolleiflexible's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Corneau View Post
    I know it will be diverting the topic but...I wouldn't have thought to expose a relatively-fast film quite that low..I'm assuming to lower contrast a bit or gain shadow detail?
    Shadow detail. Traditional B+W emulsions can take
    a lot of overexposure but are most unkind to even a
    small want of light. As a rule, I expose most films
    at half their box speeds -- insurance that I will get
    all the detail I want in the image. I process the film,
    however, as if exposed at the box speed. I'm not
    pulling the film, just "overexposing" it.

    As for grain, it is not much of an issue when shooting
    TXP in sheets. In rolls, I shoot 400TX, not TXP, and I
    usually process it in HC-110 because I find that Rodinal
    gives a more pronounced grain that is discernible in the
    smaller negatives.

  8. #8
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
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    You stated that you were using T-MAX developer with TXP 320?? Can you let us know what went wrong with that combination? I am using that film and developer right now with no problems whatsoever.... I rate the film at box speed, and for the developer, dilute it 1:4 and develop for 7.5 minutes @ 68deg F. I also replenish the developer. I've had a small 2 litre batch going for a few months now and it is working great.
    Please check out my website www.amoxomphotography.com and APUG Portfolio .....

  9. #9
    cdowell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Moxom View Post
    You stated that you were using T-MAX developer with TXP 320?? Can you let us know what went wrong with that combination? ...
    I should have said that I had not had much luck using T-Max developer in general. I've never used it with TXP 320 at all.

    I'm sure my issues with T-Max developer resulted from my slackness of methods, not any problem with the product. I think maybe processing tmax films in tmax requires a little more temperature control than I was used to providing. My normal combination (Tri-x and Ilfosol) seems pretty forgiving in comparison.

    But I haven't used tmax much at all; I'm sure it has great things to say as soon as I learn the language.

  10. #10

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    I use Rodinal with TXP at the conditions you described 1:50 15 mins and it is perfect (it is my preffered developer for LF simply because it is so economical). It also provides a more controlled contrast with not that much more grain.

    For MF I use TXP 320 in T-Max at the same conditions described by Andrew. It produces fine grain, great sharpness, and as long as you are managing your exposures well (i.e. not over-exposing...I also use box speed) then the contrast is great...check out Andrews recent work.

    Rgds, K
    Kal Khogali

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