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  1. #11

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    I don't replenish my working solution fix, but I do pour it back into a separate jar through a coffee filter. I'm not really sure if this has any effect on the byproducts in the fix, but I figured it wouldn't hurt.

  2. #12
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    For what it's worth, I wasn't thinking of prints. My film and print fixers are separate, and it's the film fixer that annoys me. I'm thinking of going to two-bath fixing for film, that way when fix 1 dies, I already have fix 2 ready and at least I don't have to mix up a new batch that instant.
    You can "replenish" B+W fix too. "Replenishing" the fixer is essentially replacing it a small part at a time rather than replacing it all at once. It's also more consistent.

    Two bath is fine, it just takes longer than one bath and toss. I'm impatient. Two bath is the "save every penny" strategy because you can safely use fix to it's limit without archival problems as the byproducts diffuse out in the second fresh fixer. It makes me wonder why color fix takes 6.5 mins if the clearing time is 30 seconds...
    --Nicholas Andre

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    ...It makes me wonder why color fix takes 6.5 mins if the clearing time is 30 seconds...
    Indeed, C-41 fixer can clear some B&W films in 30 seconds, but be aware that B&W films need far less fixing than color films. Silver that forms the image remains behind, and only the non image bearing silver halides need to be removed. Color films, both C-41 and E-6, have at least three (four?) separate layers of silver bearing emulsion, and all of the silver halides must be removed, placing a much heavier load on the fixer.
    Frank Schifano

  4. #14

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    Why Replenish When ....

    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    Dan's method virtually guarantees that the absolute
    minimum amount of fixing byproducts are present
    to cause problems later on.
    I've not done the arithmetic but believe the method
    I suggested brings dissolved silver levels well
    within 'archival' levels.

    Why replenish when likely the same amount used
    for replenishing will in itself thoroughly fix a roll
    of film?

    With the two bath method the OP would have
    twice as much fix going bad. Used little or
    not at all fixers do go bad.

    If your volume is low and you've a few minutes
    to spare the slow sodium form is the one to use.
    It makes for a quick fix to mix. Spoon up a fresh
    fix at processing time. That's what I do. Dan

  5. #15
    jnanian's Avatar
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    i have read of people plating out the silver from their fixer using something like the silver magnet ( electroplating ) .
    they use it as their first bath and use a fresh fixer as their 2nd bath ... they say they don't really have trouble ..

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