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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Moxom View Post
    that's a good idea.... but take the film, and just process/fix it without exposing it and see if the anomalies are there.
    The purpose of inspecting the film before processing is to see if the film has issues before developing. I've bought some crappy Chinese film before that had loads of specks all over the surface of the film... it helps to make sure you are dealing with a good product before you go and adulterate it

  2. #32
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Manufacturing defect in the film.

    The way it goes:

    1. One keeps doing things to try and fix it;
    2. And eventually run into some film that doesn't have the defect;
    3. Then conclude that what one was doing/not doing at the time caused the problem.

    Result: The cause is traced to not having watered the marigolds

    New Net Advice: Be sure the flowers have been watered before developing film.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  3. #33
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dfoo View Post
    Why not unspool a fresh roll before putting it in the camera and cut off the first few inches of film and inspect it to see if it has the scratches before developing.
    I should stress that the scratches seem to me to be not really scratches in the sense that either of the surfaces are literally scratched, but rather they seem to be holes in the emulsion in the shape of small lines, thus resembling scratches. The scratches/lines are not visible -at least not with a loupe or with my scanner- in unexposed or thinly exposed areas. If I want to see if the scratches are present independent of camera then the film still needs some exposure.

    I will (tomorrow I think) take a fresh, unexposed film, expose it to daylight, and develop it. No scratches means camera is guilty, yes scratches means workflow (tap water?) or something inherent to this (batch of) film. If the latter happens (yes scratches) then I will repeat the experiment and use distilled water for all stages except rinsing.

  4. #34
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    New Net Advice: Be sure the flowers have been watered before developing film.
    I have no flowers in my darkroom, they kept dying.

    The (truly) last time I went to see a fysiotherapist he suggested my foot problem has something to do with earth rays. Should I ask his opinion you think?

  5. #35
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dfoo View Post
    The purpose of inspecting the film before processing is to see if the film has issues before developing. I've bought some crappy Chinese film before that had loads of specks all over the surface of the film... it helps to make sure you are dealing with a good product before you go and adulterate it
    I don't see a problem with the unexposed film.

  6. #36
    paulie's Avatar
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    ahhh foma film, i use 4x5 and 8x10, the 8 x10 is great no issues as of yet,
    the 4x5 is a problem, scratching is a definite issue with some emulsion marks thrown in for free ,often the film edges can show streaking.

    these problems are unlikely to be your fault, its the film i guarantee it .

    my advice buy some era film of abay, its the best of the cheap three (shangers, era foma)and the cheapest

    allthough if you need cheap and extremely usable 8x10 then use foma, you just cant beat the price.

    i love foma, there papers especially

  7. #37
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Cut the unexposed film into pieces. Leave one unexposed and develop/stop/fix normally. See if problem is there without film going through camera.

    If no problem, it's likely your camera. If problem, you know it's chemistry or film related. Now is when you use distilled water to see if you can repeat the problem.

    If no problem, you know it's your water.

    For your washing, you likely only need to do your final rinse in distilled water (and wetting agent). And that doesn't take much.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #38
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    You can also try a different film and see if you have problems with it or not.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  9. #39
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Cut the unexposed film into pieces. Leave one unexposed and develop/stop/fix normally. See if problem is there without film going through camera.

    If no problem, it's likely your camera. If problem, you know it's chemistry or film related. Now is when you use distilled water to see if you can repeat the problem.

    If no problem, you know it's your water.

    For your washing, you likely only need to do your final rinse in distilled water (and wetting agent). And that doesn't take much.

    - Thomas
    That's exactly what I intend to do, as I stated above. I am not sure about rinsing in distilled water. I have no problem with doing it once, for the sake of the experiment, but to do it with every film would be too expensive for me. I pay 1 euro/litre at the local DIY store. For developer I need 600 ml (disposed after use), rinsing takes about 5x 500 ml (I think this is called the Ilford method). That's 3 euros for one film.

  10. #40
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulie View Post
    these problems are unlikely to be your fault, its the film i guarantee it.
    That's a disheartening thought, but not one I did not have myself already. It would be a great pity to say goodbye to this film, because the tonality is really nice. But I should resist the temptation to jump to conclusions, still more testing ahead.

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