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  1. #1

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    quantities of chemicals

    This will probably rank as one of the dumbest questions ever on apug... but I am just about to do my first film development. I am using 120 film in a Paterson multi-reel 3, and will be processing two 120 rolls at once so understand I need 1L of developer.

    I will be using D76 (I have the packs that make up 1L so that's easy!) I then have Ilfostop (1:19), Rapid fixer (1:4) and then Kodak Photoflo.

    I assume, like the developer, that the stop, fixer and photoflo will be made up to 1L??? Silly question but thought I should just clarify that quantities are always the same.

    I also notice that the Ilford guide to 35mm says the developer is to be made up to 300ml and then the Paterson tanks says 290... I assume 10ml doesn't matter that much??? Or is that heresy ;-) I have been doing lots of reading but everything seems slightly different and that's tough for newbies. In this case you'd go with the developer's guide not the tank right?

    Thanks very much.

  2. #2

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    don't forget fixer remover.

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    You need a litre of each to cover the spirals & film, with 2 120 reels. Paterson tanks need a minimum of 290ml with a 35mm film, but it's often easier to measure 300ml

    Keep the D76 and re-use it, follow Kodak's guidelines in the instructions.


    Quote Originally Posted by Cainquixote View Post
    don't forget fixer remover.
    Wash with water, at the same temperature

    Ian

  4. #4

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    You don't have to make 1 litre of Photo-Flo solution. You can take any clean container that is big enough to make solution for 1 roll and reuse it for as many rolls as you have. I'd advise you to use distilled/deionised water for that last step, and use that solution one shot. If you keep it, nasty stuff can grow in there; you don't want that!
    Last edited by Anon Ymous; 02-14-2010 at 05:48 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  5. #5
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mesh View Post
    This will probably rank as one of the dumbest questions ever on apug...
    Don't be so hard on yourself. I don't think you're anywhere near the top of that list.

  6. #6

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    Thanks for the replies. Didn't think about reusing the developer - whilst I am learning and the pics are hardly prize winners it's a great idea. One more quick question please... For the time being I think I'll be doing either two rolls of 120 or 3 rolls of 35mm. For simplicity, could I make up 1L for the 35mm (as the 120) or should I recalculate for 900ml? Just seems less intimidating to keep it all the same.

  7. #7

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    To start with I'd suggest NOT re-using the developer, as that is just one more variable which you will need to control due to needing to add some time for each re-use. Instead, dilute the stock 1:1 (meaning equal amounts of water and stock-solution to make your required volume) with tap water, use it once only and then dilute another amount for your next developing session when you need it. Diluted-developer like this is also a very standard technique and adds a little bit of consistency for you while even improving sharpness slightly in D76.

    The stop-bath can be re-used many times, until the indicator makes it change colour, or you get bored one day and want to make some fresh stuff up! The wetting agent seems to go a bit disgustingly slimey, especially after a few weeks of warm weather, so dump it regularly or use it once only. The fixer can be re-used, bearing in mind the surface-area of film fixed - or more simply for a few weeks while checking it before each use with a scrap of undeveloped film. Pour a little fixer into a saucer and check that the scrap of film clears within, say, 90 seconds. Make a note of that time then fix the film in the tank for double, rounded up to the nearest minute for convenience.

    The volumes you will need for different sorts of film are moulded in to the bottom of the Paterson tanks, so cannot get lost on some loose instruction-sheet etc. Double check that you choose the right volume of course. Rounding up slightly, 300ml in place of 290ml for example, wouldn't do any harm so long as you don't just fill the tank up to the top every time. The airspace at the top (above the film, where the funnel is) is necessary to allow a proper movement of the developer during inversion. A useful tip to avoid leaks is to put the lid on the tank like on a sandwich box - click it on, then squeeze it slightly while letting out some air, giving a slight vacuam effect. No leaks, but keep your hand over the lid when inverting, as that much developer sloshing around could pop the lid off.

    Film washing can be done from a supply of water at the right temperature (a big jug or a full bucket for example) by following the fill/invert/empty system suggested by Ilford, among others. That is well documented in all the Ilford product notes, and in various threads here.

    Have fun !

  8. #8

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    Thanks very much Martin - that's great info.

    So my pack of D-76 which makes 1L of developer, is in fact 2L at 1:1?? Is this correct? Any advantage at full strength? So you're saying I can save 500ml to make another 1L batch later on? That would be great as I was a little surprised at the cost of the developer...

    I know there is heaps of info on the net for timing, but again, all say something a little bit different - I realise this is where the 'art' comes in! Could someone please give me a guide to times please using TMY400? So far I assume it will be 12.5 minutes in D76 @ 1:1 (20 degrees). Stop for 30 seconds. Fixer 2 minutes. Wash 5 minutes. Photoflo 30 seconds.

    Thanks,

    David

  9. #9

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    Don't reuse the developer.

    Mix up your liter of D76 per instructions. That is your STOCK solution. Divide it btw 2 500ml or 4 250ml containers, to keep the unused portions fresh and unexposed to air.

    At the time you are going to develop your film, dilute the appropriate amount of developer with water 1:1 (equal amounts). For my tank which holds two 35mm reels, this is 450ml total solution, so 225ml each of dev and water.

    Kodak recommends 10 3/4 min for TMY-2 and D76 1:1 (20 deg C) in a small tank.

    I use water as a stop, but if you do use a stop, follow the directions on the package for dilution and time.

    TMY needs much more fixing time than 2 minutes, in fact, so does most other film. At least 5 minutes, and possibly more for TMY or TMX. With fresh fixer, I fix TMY for 5-6 minutes. You can reuse your fixer as long as you mark how many rolls have gone through it, so you know how fresh it is. I count each roll of TMY or TMX as 2 rolls, since it is harder on fixer than other films.

    I use a hypo-clear agent for about 2 minutes, then wash for 5 min. If not using hypo-clear, I'd wash or exchange water for longer than 5 min.

    Photoflo for 30 sec is good, mix it with distilled water, and just a few drops...that's all.

    After that step, hang to dry.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by mesh View Post
    Thanks very much Martin - that's great info.

    So my pack of D-76 which makes 1L of developer, is in fact 2L at 1:1?? Is this correct? Any advantage at full strength? So you're saying I can save 500ml to make another 1L batch later on? That would be great as I was a little surprised at the cost of the developer...
    At 1+1, you'll gain a bit of film speed and sharpness, while getting a bit more grain. D76 1+1 is just fine. Buying 1l of D76/ID11 is expensive, buy the larger package next time.

    Quote Originally Posted by mesh View Post
    I know there is heaps of info on the net for timing, but again, all say something a little bit different - I realise this is where the 'art' comes in! Could someone please give me a guide to times please using TMY400? So far I assume it will be 12.5 minutes in D76 @ 1:1 (20 degrees). Stop for 30 seconds. Fixer 2 minutes. Wash 5 minutes. Photoflo 30 seconds.

    Thanks,

    David
    Follow Kodak's procedure for a start and don't look anywhere else. Once you've gained experience, you can start experimenting, but don't blindly follow something you saw on the web, ever! Your development time seems odd and fixing time is too short! You need at least 5' in Ilford rapid 1+4. 7,5' is fine for me.

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