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Thread: Night shots

  1. #11
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    hello Andrew,

    you might try also this link
    it is written in German...
    http://www.wolfgangmothes.de/nachtaufnahmen203.pdf

    Fred

  2. #12

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    Star-stopper

    The only way to get rid of "stars" around blown-out highlights is to have an aperture without overlapping leaves--either a waterhouse stop or a lens used wide open (although a few lenses still have blades exposed even wide open.)

    This is one of the reasons I like my Mamiya 50/6.3 on 6x9 so much for night work--it's so slow (and wide) that you actually have a lot of DOF wide open, and it's certainly sharp wide open as well. If only it were multi-coated....

  3. #13
    tbm
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    Your Microdol-X soup should be at 75 degrees, not 68, when diluted 1:3. This is per Stephen Anchell and Bill Troop's book, wherein they recommend processing it for 13 minutes at this ratio and this temperature. A pro photographer I know told me to develop it for 18, not 13, minutes based on these factors. His full statement is as follows:

    "For some time I searched for a developer for Tri-X film that was soft enough in the highlights so that they didn't block with full development. The old standby, D-76, even in its diluted form, blocked the highlights more than I wanted. I found my softer developer in Microdol-X about twenty years ago. With Tri-X I use it diluted 1:3 for the additional compensating action in the shadow areas. My development times are long, usually 18 minutes at 74 degrees, but I get a full ISO 400 and the negatives will show detail in brilliant snow or in a burned-in overexposed flash foreground light on down to the proverbial black cat in coalbin shadows."

    I have gotten beautiful results with his recommendation above with my Leica lenses. I highly suggest you try this development technique, too. Remember, though, that the star effect you mention can be partly produced by the lenses you use--the quality of their glass and coatings. My Leica lenses do not produce flare at all. Whose lenses have you been using?

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Josef Guay
    I have had good success with night shots using T-Max 100 developed in PMK. The negatives are fairly easy to print. I also found a lens hood to be very helpfull in preventing flare from stray light.
    Theoretically PMK (or Pyrocat-HD) should minimise halo because of the gelatin hardening effect. I have used PMK for church interiors including grossly overexposed windows, and found quite good detail retained in the window area. This was with TMax 400 in 35mm.

  5. #15

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    Andrew Sanderson wrote a good book appropriately called Night Photography. Mainly using various B&W films and formats. It's a great how-to book which includes information on exposure/development to printing. Dealing with any lighting issue you'll find out there. The hip tools are the charts of relative exposure times.
    Cheers
    The Rat

  6. #16

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    tbm: Are you saying that Leica lenses, used stopped down, will not produce "stars" from blown-out in-scene light sources? I have some difficulty believing this.

    If coating deficiencies were to blame for "stars" I wouldn't be able to suppress them so easily by shooting my single-coated old Mamiyas wide open. Flare is most assuredly coating (and surface count) related, but that's not what's under discussion--"stars" are. They can't be fixed with good coating, good film, good developer or even a shamrock in your pocket. They're an aperture phenomenon, period.

  7. #17

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    I like to shoot Ilford Delta 3200 at night. Also handheld for blurry and weird shots. It's grainy nature is NICE and moody for nightshots.

    Morten

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