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  1. #21
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Donald Miller]My question is why one would consider using this choice of two developers with a VC paper...this is a technique used many years ago with graded papers; the effect was to move "between grades"...hardly necessary or attractive in this time of variable contrast materials.


    Using two bath developers with VC papers provides another level of control, for example, when very delicate high values are required in the print.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by jstewart
    My toning experiments in Sel 1:19 .......

    I'm wondering what could explain why some can get a good hue shift with Sel while others don't. Should I be using a stronger dilution of Selenium (I use KRST by the way).

    Jim

    Stronger dilutions induce much more colour change, normally. Warmer papers shift in tone more obviously than cool papers and warm papers often change colour quite easily even if dilute selenium used (esp forte). KRST is potent stuff and colour shift take place with Forte PWT or PG at 1+19 very comfortably (too fast for me). I dilute approx double this or use very cold when using forte papers otherwise you end up with a rust red/plum in no time at all esp if the solutions are warm (I often tone outdoors in the summer). shift also depends upon the image tones. If an image has few half tones, you will see less colour shift as most tones are either black or pale grey. Warm tone images where there are lots of middle values show the greatest apparent colour change. Most cold papers show a change in colour only noticeable in comparison with a wet untoned print, esp if a cold tone dev used in the first place. I find that when toning for Dmax with cold papers an untoned wet reference print in an adjacent tray is essential for seeing how far the Dmax has increased and to make sure you dont get confused and go too far and reduce Dmax.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by david b
    I would do this:

    1.5 minutes in selectol soft and then 1.5 minutes in dektol.

    the selectol soft will just do the highlight first, and then the dektol will take care of the midtones and shadow detail.
    Why would you go here as a starting point? If the negatives have good detail, you don't need Selectol Soft. Dektol will do a fine job. The approach you have suggested is to gain a 1/2 papergrade contrast reduction. It is a step that is used to fine-tune a print being made with graded paper. To suggest this as the initial approach to the negatives is puzzling.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by blaughn
    Why would you go here as a starting point? If the negatives have good detail, you don't need Selectol Soft. Dektol will do a fine job. The approach you have suggested is to gain a 1/2 papergrade contrast reduction. It is a step that is used to fine-tune a print being made with graded paper. To suggest this as the initial approach to the negatives is puzzling.
    I agree, keep things simple. I print at one grade when it is all I need. I only complicate thigs when I have to.........

    I have found that the more time I spend printing, the less I have to try complex things as I am better in control of the basics and can massage them to work better for me than previously (like small changes in main grade, dev time, and toning time/concentration. I would never initially approach a print as a split grade as normally this just is not neccessary apart from perhaps some local hard or soft. Split grade for me, is for when the simple tools dont work. Sometimes one is pleaseantly surpised how easy a print can be. I would hate to have spent time zeroing in for split grades when my second attempt is spot on......

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stanworth
    I agree, keep things simple. I print at one grade when it is all I need. I only complicate thigs when I have to.........

    I have found that the more time I spend printing, the less I have to try complex things as I am better in control of the basics and can massage them to work better for me than previously (like small changes in main grade, dev time, and toning time/concentration. I would never initially approach a print as a split grade as normally this just is not neccessary apart from perhaps some local hard or soft. Split grade for me, is for when the simple tools dont work. Sometimes one is pleaseantly surpised how easy a print can be. I would hate to have spent time zeroing in for split grades when my second attempt is spot on......
    Amen. I used to experiment with different developers, film, paper, toners. I discovered this camouflaged the fact that I am the weak link and handling all of the complexity kept me from concentrating on the learning and discipline needed to improve my contribution to the process.

    Start with one film, one paper, one developer for each and work with them until you can verbalize why you need to change. If you want help selecting what materials to work with, look to the pros - not the seekers. I am a huge fan of John Sexton. He uses Tmax 100, Tmax RS 1:9 and xtol. He prints primarily on Polymax Fine Art using dektol 1:2. I have seen his work first hand and if these materials satisfy his requirements, they satisfy mine. When I use these materials, I am certain I am not being held back because the developer doesn't handle the shadows well. If my shadows are empty, it is because I failed to place them at an appropriate level on the film.

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