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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by avandesande
    Maybe somebody should invent a tylenol developer
    The active ingredient in tylenol is a derivative of p-aminophenol. There was an article many years ago in the Dignan Newsletter on how to make a developer from a couple of Tylenol tablets, some sodium sulfite and some sodium hydroxide.

  2. #62

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    This is web legend. This really happens with synthetic opiates such as fentanyl.
    http://www.totse.com/en/drugs/rare_a.../opiatesy.html

    There isn't any connection between phenolics an parkinsons.



    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Koch
    There is a definite genetic component in Parkinson's disease. However, a few years ago, a group of young people began showing severe symptoms similar to those of Parkinson's. Their condition was finally traced back to a bad batch of Ecstasy. A class of compounds called orthoquinones were implicated as contributing to the toxicity. Unsubstituted orthoquinone is the oxidation product of catechol.

  3. #63

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    A portion of one of numerous medical articles concerning the toxicity of catechol to nerve cells.

    Since catechol autoxidizes in physiological phosphate buffer, we hypothesized that it could be toxic towards glial cells due to the generation of reactive oxygen species and quinones. In this work we studied the cytotoxic properties of catechol towards human glioblastoma cells. We found that catechol was toxic towards these cells after 72 hours and this toxicity was related to the formation of quinones. Catechol at 230µM killed 50% of cells. The catechol-induced cytotoxicity was prevented by the addition of 100U superoxide dismutase, which also inhibited the formation of quinones. These data suggest that catechol induces cytotoxicity via the extracellular generation of superoxide and quinones.

  4. #64

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    Cytotoxic? Maybe. Parkinson's, no.

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo
    leprechaun sweat was a magic elixer of photoformulary.
    Where can I get it, and what is the working strength?

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by avandesande
    Cytotoxic? Maybe. Parkinson's, no.
    This was the point that I was trying to make -- perhaps not clearly. Edward Weston could have had true Parkinson's disease or he could have had something else which was mistaken for Parkinson's and which *could* have been caused by exposure to developing agents.

  7. #67

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    If you would like to take this offline we can discuss octanol coefficients, para-chloro-amphetamine, and brain damage.

    Pyrogallol does not cause parkinson's or parkinson's-like symptoms.

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