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Thread: Fixer Confusion

  1. #11
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Leon
    I've never used washaid and as I said in my first post I've never had a film go off on me since I started using the Ilford method.

    Poco
    I don't let my films sit in between changes of water, as far as I'm concerned it's just a waste of time that prolongs the process that I hate most in my photography.

    Frank B
    The method I posted is my own modification. I'm a former accountant who believes nothing that anyone says and have an unhealthy paranoia about making sure that my films are archival. I was told by a photographer at the beginning of my interest in photography to put a "slurp" of dilute hydrogen peroxide in the developing tank with the first water rinse after the film had been fixed to speed up the washing to a couple of minutes. Needless to say a few months later my films began to stain and were ruined. I learned a hard but good lesson with that experience.

  2. #12
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    Les's washing technic sounds interesting. I've not been aware of it at all. The conventional wisdom as i understood it was that one needed to leave the film washing until 12 full changes had occured....often 30 minutes or more. i've just cut to the chase and filled the tank (i use a daylight tank for 4x5 film just for washing after tray developing), sloshed the film, and emptied the tank 12 times. takes less than ten minutes and i've never had a problem. i like the idea of inversions though, however it won't work for my 4x5 negs.
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  3. #13
    Leon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Les McLean
    Leon
    I've never used washaid and as I said in my first post I've never had a film go off on me since I started using the Ilford method.
    thanks Les, although I was asking about prints rather than film - not sure how we got on to film...

  4. #14
    ann
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    Leon;
    somewhere in one of these thread there was a discussion about soaking and dumping prints. Bruce Barnbaum uses a method were he rinses each print then places in a tray for 10 minutes and then changes to a new tray with fresh water and then repeats for the third time. If i remember correctly he talks about that in his book "the art of photography an approach to personal expression". ALso , i do believe Aggie had a workshop with him and may speak up with more personal experince.

    I also know that Jonathan Bailey uses a soaking approach. Perhaps many others do but i can only speak to these for sure.

  5. #15
    Leon's Avatar
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    thanks for that Ann - it is very interesting and something I will look into more closely as I am always looking at ways in which we can make less impact on the environment.

    What i really wanted to ask was, in Archival washing of prints which are to be toned in eithe selenium or indirect sepia (FB in particular) is there any point using an HCA with an Alkaline fix like tf3 or tf4?

  6. #16
    lee
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    I don't know if this applies but I fix and then rinse the prints before I selenium tone and then I use sodium sulfite as a hypo clear and then in to the wash. No staining or longevity issues that I have ever seen. With alkaline fixers it surely won't hurt to run them thru HCA. Since I don't use alklaline fixers I can not say if it is really necessary.

    lee\c

    edited by lee\c to add more info that may not be revelant.

    lee
    Last edited by lee; 06-07-2004 at 02:02 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: to add information

  7. #17
    ann
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    It has been a long time since i used T4 fixer as i hate to pay shipping on water. When i did, i didn't use HCA as I follwed the Formulary recommendations; and i was using their product.
    Now i use Ilford's Rapid fixer and I do use HCA before and after toning. I believe Ilford has standize the name to hypan but it is the same stuff.

    Don't know if this helps you are not. When I used T4 i did run some hypo check test and it tested just fine and i did follow the directions provided by PF which was not to use HCA.

  8. #18

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    With both prints and film, the intial water rinse gets rid of most of the fixer on the surface. After that, removing the remaining fixer is primarily a diffusion process, so soaking in several water changes with occasional agitation works very well.

    As others have said, a non-hardening alkaline fixer will be easiest to remove. A slightly acidic non-hardening fixer will also wash out easily.

    A residual fixer test can be perfomed to verify that your washing process is archival for the film or paper you are processing.
    See: http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/Ar.../archival.html
    Tom Hoskinson
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  9. #19
    FrankB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Les McLean
    The method I posted is my own modification. I'm a former accountant who believes nothing that anyone says and have an unhealthy paranoia about making sure that my films are archival. I was told by a photographer at the beginning of my interest in photography to put a "slurp" of dilute hydrogen peroxide in the developing tank with the first water rinse after the film had been fixed to speed up the washing to a couple of minutes. Needless to say a few months later my films began to stain and were ruined. I learned a hard but good lesson with that experience.
    Thanks for that, Les, but what's unhealthy about paranoia?!

    I'll add a couple more cycles to my own regime, although I live in a hard-water area and filtering sufficient water for a process run through a jug filter is a major pain! If I ever defect to the digital camp (not likely anytime soon) it'll be film processing that does for me!

    Thanks again,

    Frank

  10. #20
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=FrankB]Thanks for that, Les, but what's unhealthy about paranoia?!

    I'll add a couple more cycles to my own regime, although I live in a hard-water area and filtering sufficient water for a process run through a jug filter is a major pain! If I ever defect to the digital camp (not likely anytime soon) it'll be film processing that does for me!

    I once lived on a farm where the private spring water supply needed filtering and I used to fill a large container with the water and leave it overnight to settle and the syphon off all but the botton 2 or 3 inches. It worked for me although it was not hard water, it was just full of peat and other bits and bobs.

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