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  1. #11

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    Mar 2003
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    'I've never tried this, but I seem to be making myself curious here'

    I'm on it...... I lugged home a few gallons of brackish bog brew this morning!

  2. #12

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    Dec 2002
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    I have given some thought to the earlier recommendation of lye (NaOH) added to your brew.

    I would not personally use that in a film developer unless it was very dilute. The ph would be excessive. The accelerator(s) that seems the most applicable to film developers would be sodium carbonate (NaCO3) or potassium carbonate (KCO3).

  3. #13
    Ole
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    Any alkali can be used, I used lye as an example. At least it was intended as such. But since the quality and type of developing agent in peaty water is utterly unknown, I would go for very high pH - dilute lye. This brown goop also tends to be slightly acidic.

    Besides, I don't think this kind of developer can be "optimised" in any way. It will remain a curiosity, and not a source of cheap high-quality developer. So the type of alkali is unimportant - but I know I'm going to use lye (sodium hydroxide).
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  4. #14

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    Mar 2003
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    Primitive chemistry is an amusing diversion and sometimes the results are surprising. I have made about a dozen images using various primordial soups and raw emulsions. Recently when I was using black iris pigment for a paper emulsion (this makes an image similar to cyanotype but a violet colour..... exposure is measured in days) I applied a mild solution of neutral pH fixer and the image 'disappeared' and the experiment ended up forgotten on a table near a window..... rediscovered it a few days later and it had revealed a watery version of its former self in an ochre colour... and it is getting darker every day it basks in the sun. For me standardizing and optimizing is not the objective.... it is rather like a type of folk art where you end up with a enchanting 'photographic whirligig'.

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