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  1. #41
    Bijesh's Avatar
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    Speciality bottle, as mentioned by others in this thread, is the best place to buy amber bottles. They have it in all sizes up to 32oz and the prices are not that high.

  2. #42
    mts
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    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  3. #43
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    I'm going to place a large order at the end of this week for about 40 bottles. 5 each 16 and 32 ounce and 10 each 1, 2, and 4 ounce. I figure that adding more bottles doesn't really up my shipping much and it isn't like they expire. This way I have enough for if I decide I really like this alternative process junk and I want to try others. I got amber, but I know I could get clear for the developers...I just like the look of amber better.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  4. #44
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    Thanks PE for crushing this old "amber" myth that lives too well! Clear bottles indeed are so much better because you can see the color of the liquid and if there's any crud.

    Now, I would like to know if PET plastic bottles "breathe". I would say; NO. If they would, it would also be problematic to store soft drinks for a year or so. AFAIK, thin LDPE is problematic, but thicker HDPE bottles as well as PET bottles (even the thinner ones) should be as good as glass. After all, almost all photo chemistry is sold in HDPE bottles.

    I might be wrong but if I am I would like to have it proved to me.

    When air is your enemy, many people think that plastic bottles breathe too much and use glass bottles; trapping much more air in the bottle than the plastic bottle (than can be squeezed tightly) would ever breathe. I've also found in my simple, controlled experiment that it's not easy to displace all the air with a preservative spray gas without proper equipment. Squeezing the plastic bottle or adding marbles to glass bottle is definitely more reliable.

  5. #45

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    2 liter PET soft drink bottles are pressure vessels that will hold 75psi for months on end, I don't think they breathe much at all. D76 stock mixed with distilled water remains water white after being stored in one for 12 months, RA4 dev easily keeps for 2 months or longer in 2 liter or 500ml thin wall water bottles, what more could you ask for.

  6. #46
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    Some pharmacys throw them out so they might be had for free.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    I've also found in my simple, controlled experiment that it's not easy to displace all the air with a preservative spray gas without proper equipment. Squeezing the plastic bottle or adding marbles to glass bottle is definitely more reliable.
    The gas only makes a super thin barrier to air ingress on the surface of the developer or what-have-you in the bottle. It spreads itself out automatically. You don't need to fill the bottle with it. There's still 'air' inside the bottle - it just cannot get to the chems...

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky View Post
    The gas only makes a super thin barrier to air ingress on the surface of the developer or what-have-you in the bottle. It spreads itself out automatically. You don't need to fill the bottle with it. There's still 'air' inside the bottle - it just cannot get to the chems...
    This is just what I proved to be a myth. I made four samples: first one was a completely squeezed PET bottle, second one had quite a lot of gas, third one had considerably less gas and the fourth had no gas. Then they were untouched for a month. I used butane. Heavier than air, it should work well as you say.

    The squeezed one survived clearly best. There was a great difference between "much gas" and "less gas" samples, which proves my point that it does NOT work like you say. And, last, the one with no gas was the worst.

    The results were surprisingly distinct. I measured the density of developed film, but the same results could also be seen in the color of the solution. It was a nice series from clear to yellow with two "midtones" on these four samples. RGB values from scanned film tests were; 56 (squeezed bottle), 63 (much butane), 72 (less butane), 76 (no butane).

    The same test also revealed that refrigerating at +5C even with no gas was much better than gas at room temp, as good as squeezing the bottle. Squeezing the bottle and storing at a reduced temperature (but not too low not to precipitate things; +10C is probably completely safe) is ultimate.
    Last edited by hrst; 03-22-2010 at 02:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #49

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    Glass Boston Rounds

    Quote Originally Posted by Rinthe View Post
    I'm trying to find these glass bottles for storing my
    developer. Can't find them anywhere.
    Many sources via Google. Boston Rounds are a standard
    for chemical storage. A variety of caps are available.
    Wide and narrow mouth. Colorless or amber the
    glass is clear; easy content and cleanliness
    checks. Sturdy and inexpensive. Dan

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    I used butane. Heavier than air, it should work well as you say.
    I wouldn't expect Butane to work. It's not inert. It will combine to some degree with your soup. The reason they use a noble or inert gas is because it's ions have zero net valence. So no electron action at all... no mixing, no reaction.But anyway- we're all just splitting hairs here. I'm sure if you used the right kind of plastic - it would work fine. It's just that the problem is that there's a LOT of low grade plastic out there unsuitable for any solution, even of a neutral pH...



 

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