Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,842   Posts: 1,582,645   Online: 1044
      
Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678910 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 92
  1. #51
    hrst's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,300
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky View Post
    I wouldn't expect Butane to work. It's not inert.
    It's sold as inert gas for preserving photographic solutions by Tetenal and others with their own brand names. This is first time I hear it not being inert with photographic developers. Possible, though.

  2. #52
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,531
    Images
    65
    Well, Butane is a pretty inert organic gas in the absence of Oxygen or electric spark.

    The best clear thick plastic bottles are made by Jobo IMHO. I have been able to store developer for up to nearly a year now in them.

    PE

  3. #53

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    VT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    577
    Images
    1
    I have both clear and brown bottles, including several quart Boston Rounds that I purchased liquid Microdol-X in years ago.

  4. #54
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,224
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    ................We used clear glass and thick plastic bottes with corks or screw caps to store our developers. Our lab storage areas were brightly lit with fluorescent lights for 8 hours / day. There was NO PROBLEM.

    PE
    I have no disagreement with your statement, just two questions and a thought.

    Many amateurs don't use chemistry up as fast as a commercial lab. How long was the typical bottle of developer sitting around in the daylight environment? Also, in the lab, did you (or they) use a inert gas in the bottle each time it was opened then closed?

    One small but important advantage to "Amber" is it alerts a person that it not drinkable. Of course, using amber beer bottles or clear soda bottles, this is a real and present danger that is easily avoided.

    Labels can fall off or be smudged and not readable so may not be reliable.

    One last thought, although not a easy to see as if clear, but holding a amber glass bottle in front of a light bulb, I can see if anything is floating, as least I think I can.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  5. #55
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,224
    Quote Originally Posted by sepiareverb View Post
    I have both clear and brown bottles, including several quart Boston Rounds that I purchased liquid Microdol-X in years ago.
    I wonder why Kodak used brown bottles if it was not needed? Would then not of saved a few pennies multiplied by tens of thousands bottles?
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  6. #56

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Greece
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,322
    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    I wonder why Kodak used brown bottles if it was not needed? Would then not of saved a few pennies multiplied by tens of thousands bottles?
    Maybe because the retailers wouldn't necessarily store their merchandise in ideal conditions, as opposed to the user, who can at least resort to cardboards?

  7. #57
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,531
    Images
    65
    Hey, I never said brown bottles were not needed. I have said that YOU don't need them in your darkroom due to the low light level and the lack of UV. Kodak and others needed brown bottles to insure safe keeping during shipment and storage in showcases at photo stores.

    These are two different situations. However, please note that most all color kits from EK are not in brown bottles, but rather thick plastic, and that liquid developer concentrates such as HC110 are also in clear heavy plastic.

    PE

  8. #58

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    VT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    577
    Images
    1
    I store my HC-110 in syrup form in the little plastic bottles. I found one, partially used but sealed, which had fallen off a shelf in the darkroom and had to have been there for three years minimum. It was a little darker than the new, but tested fine. I used it up and haven't worried about HC-110 keeping any more!

  9. #59

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,268
    Swing by your local chemistry lab and ask they if they have any old acid bottles - sulfuric, nitric, hydrochloric, it doesn't matter which, and see if they will give you some. They are clear, heavy glass with a chemical resistant cap and they typically have a clear plastic coating on them so that if they get dropped, they will not loose all the liquid in them. (That is, as long as they don't get the neck broken on them...)

    They are usually in the 4 Liter size.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  10. #60

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684

    Consider the Caps --- Liters not Quarts

    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie Brim View Post
    I'm going to place a large order at the end of this week ...
    Likely you should have the Polycone or Polyseal caps.
    They screw on and as the cap is applied the included
    'cork' is forced into the mouth of the bottle. I can't
    imagine a more secure seal. Stay away from
    metal caps as they may corrode.

    Also the bottles are some fraction of a liter save for
    the 1 ounce which is over sized. A 2 ounce is 62.5 ml,
    a 4 ounce is 125 ml and on up. Boston Rounds are much
    in use. The exact hue of the ambers may vary slightly
    from one batch to another and from one or another
    manufacturer. Dan



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin