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  1. #61
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    If you are going to have gallon and 4L or 5L glass containers with processing solutions in them, I suggest that you get a chemical carryall. It is a foam plastic container made in several sizes and shapes to fit different glass containers. They have two convenient strap handles for carrying.

    If you drop one, the bottle will either not break due to the cushion of the foam plastic, or if it does, the plastic usually contains the liquid completely or partially thus minimizing the mess if you do have an accident. These carryall containers were required for moving individual glass bottles at EK.

    PE

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    Amber Glass Bottles

    I have a number of Grolsch bottles which I use for storing chemicals. Most of these are green but a dark beer was sold in amber bottles. The problem now with Grolsch bottles is that they have been restyled and now hold slightly less than they used to. Luckily I have enough older ones. The stoppers used to be ceramic and were changed to plastic years ago. When some of the rubber washers started to crack I ordered a bag of them from a brewing supply company.

  3. #63
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Ok people, ante up. Show me a photo textbook that illustrates a photolytic reaction with a developer that does not take blasting with UV or sunlight!

    We used clear glass and thick plastic bottes with corks or screw caps to store our developers. Our lab storage areas were brightly lit with fluorescent lights for 8 hours / day. There was NO PROBLEM.

    PE
    Ron,

    I hear what you're saying. It's just that my amber bottles are essentially free as I enjoy the benefits of the flax oil they originally contained. Rather than tossing the glass bottle out to be recycled at a certain energy cost, I reuse the bottles in my darkroom.

    And now the truth... I just think amber bottles look cool. All of my non-photographer friends are REALLY IMPRESSED by amber and not so excited about clear bottles.

  4. #64
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    I use the amber because a long time ago I read somewhere that not all the clear glass battles were chemically neutral. Quite possibly bull, but why take the chance.

    One thing that is a TERRIBLE practice is to use any sort of food or Beverage container for anything that is not a food or beverage. Kids wander into places unexpectedly and you can't watch them. even worse adults are also possibly around. Using a chemical bottle makes it quite clear that the contents are not food.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  5. #65
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Leaded glass is one of the only instances of non-neutral glass that I know of offhand.

    Don't use it. OTOH, leaded glass is quite expensive and also can be poisonous if used for storage of acidic foods and drinks.

    PE

  6. #66
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    You can get glass amber reagent bottles with screw top caps (you can get glass stoppered bottles, but screw tops are more reliable, i have found some glass stopper bottles from the same place will not form an airtight enough seal to prevent early oxidation, while some will, luck of the draw) from ebay sellers and online shops that deal in lab glassware.

    I usually get my stuff from wiltronics on ebay or wiltronics.com.au or use their magazine catalogue.

  7. #67
    Wade D's Avatar
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    The only reason I use 1 gal. brown glass bottles is that I worked at a pharmacy in the early 70's. They were not allowed to re-use them so just tossed them out...until I started working there. I carefully washed and de-labeled them and sold them to my photo enthusiast friends for a buck apiece. Still have and use 10 or so.
    Now they use brown plastic bottles and still toss them. Ask your local pharmacy if they have any.
    I agree that clear glass or plastic works just as well as the brown ones. I just happened to work at the right place at the right time.

  8. #68
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmacd123 View Post
    I use the amber because a long time ago I read somewhere that not all the clear glass battles were chemically neutral. Quite possibly bull, but why take the chance.

    One thing that is a TERRIBLE practice is to use any sort of food or Beverage container for anything that is not a food or beverage. Kids wander into places unexpectedly and you can't watch them. even worse adults are also possibly around. Using a chemical bottle makes it quite clear that the contents are not food.
    I think I raised my kids to be fairly intelligent people. They know not to wander into my darkroom... a place that they know full well is of foul poisons ... , open random glass bottles and drink the contents. If they are thirsty then they go to the logical place for a drink... the kitchen.

    Besides, the food labels have been removed from the bottles and replaced with labels indicating the nature of the current contents.

  9. #69
    CBG
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    I use heavy white duct tape and sharpie markers so my label doesn't come off and my markings stay put. On the few recycled soda or food containers that I use, all original labelings are removed. No way they look like anonymous potable liquids. AND I am the only one in the darkroom. No kids.

  10. #70

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    I didn't read the whole thread, but you can usually get brown glass bottles in various sizes from Photographer's Formulary
    John Bowen



 

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