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  1. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    ...please note that most all color kits from EK are not in brown bottles, but rather thick plastic, and that liquid developer concentrates such as HC110 are also in clear heavy plastic.
    PE
    Perhaps. but some color chems did come in brown glass bottles... eg. the E6 Hobby-Pac Color Developer part 2A was in a brown glass bottle. It contained ca. 100 ml. and (including cap) weighed (empty) about 94.14 g.

    Other chems were found in strong, opaque(?) silver bags...

    But at any rate, these color kits were all enclosed in boxes up until the time they to be mixed, so....

    The last T-Max developer I bought came in a tough light reducing grey bottle.
    The last Rodinal I got came in a white plastic bottle.
    All of these did reduce light intensity somewhat more than plain clear bottles...

    Not that this is to take away from the point which you make very well.

    It is my understanding that the choice of color for bottling beverages was not primarially one of aesthetic; In a well designed product, the glass color was actually functional... of course for some it might very well be all aesthetics.

  2. #72

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    how important is it to displace air from the bottle? how fast will chemicals go bad?

    when people say they keep the bottles topped off, i always wonder how they do it. where is this extra chemistry coming from? if it's fixer, i can understand that, but what about developer?

    is there a cheaper alternative to the argon gas can linked to earlier?

  3. #73
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    Beer, in clear bottles, forms an unpalatable byproduct with keeping due to photolytic reactions. It is offset by mild acid. This is why Corona beer is recommended to be drunk with a wedge of lime to "flavor" it. What it does is remove the bad taste and add a limey taste over it.

    This type of photolytic reaction is very rare, and almost unheard of with most photoproducts, but for long storage, Kodak took the safest way and tried to prevent any chance of bright light interaction. Versatol, one of Kodak's first liquid concentrates, came in brown bottles as well.

    Sometimes you go that way because someone cuts you a deal on huge quantities of brown bottles.

    PE

  4. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by raizans View Post
    how important is it to displace air from the bottle? how fast will chemicals go bad?

    when people say they keep the bottles topped off, i always wonder how they do it. where is this extra chemistry coming from? if it's fixer, i can understand that, but what about developer?

    is there a cheaper alternative to the argon gas can linked to earlier?
    The difference is months vs weeks when air is replaced by Nitrogen or other inert gas.

    I use Nitrogen. A tank lasts me several years and costs under $30 at the local welding supply. Of course, I own my own tank. If you do not, then you must pay rent on the tank. And, I own my own valve. Generally these run about $100 and $120 up front as initial costs.

    PE

  5. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by raizans View Post
    how important is it to displace air from the bottle?
    It's the most important thing.

    when people say they keep the bottles topped off, i always wonder how they do it.
    Use plastic soda bottles. You can squeeze them. It's easiest.

    With glass bottles, you have to use marbles or protective gas.

  6. #76

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    hmm...marbles sound messy, like they'd roll all over the place when you decant the chemistry. i think i'll track down a nitrogen tank.

  7. #77

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    Well, you could always siphon...

    but then again, unless you are doing high volumes, I doubt it is really worth the expense or the trouble.
    That is to say, there are other means. Nitrogen etc. is convenient for some (especially if they use it for agitation as well...) but one can also simply fill their glass container to the top to expell the air before sealing... any leftover could be stored in a smaller bottle... also filled to the top.
    That works pretty well I think.

    Floating covers are used by some; It would seem possible someone could devise a bottle with a floating lid (dropped or built) inside, that still allows you to pour out the solution smoothly.

    But all of this is for people whose rate of film use is so low that their solutions go bad from storage rather than use. For those people, in the absence of an indicator or practical test, oneshot use, or even better, freshly mixed chemistry would seem to me to be the best bet.
    Last edited by Ray Rogers; 03-24-2010 at 03:38 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #78

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    I work in a pharmacy and get amber glass bottles with metal caps after the bottle of drug is used up... I just delabel them and wash them out

  9. #79
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    I used to use glass bottles with metal caps. I found that a number of them began corroding. I had to use pliers to get them off the bottle. So, beware. And, some metals can harm photochemicals.

    PE

  10. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I used to use glass bottles with metal caps. I found that a number of them began corroding. I had to use pliers to get them off the bottle. So, beware. And, some metals can harm photochemicals.

    PE
    YES!

    Many of mine had separated top from sides so some of them were easy to remove!

    :o

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