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  1. #11

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    I would not have selected Perceptol as my developer of choice for this film, but no matter. I'm sure good things can be done with it. Please do go to the Ilford site and follow their recommendations for development. Their recommendations are very good and quite comprehensive for this film. I usually develop PanF+ in D-76 diluted 1+3 according to Ilford's recommendation and the negatives are beautiful. PanF+ tends to want to build a lot of contrast, and is especially prone to blown highlights if you're not careful. The highly dilute D-76 (same exact thing as ID-11) takes care of that problem nicely.

    If you decide to use Perceptol full strength, realize that it can cost you about a stop of film speed because the of the developer's high solvent action. I'd recommend rating the film at EI 25 rather than box speed to preserve good shadow detail. At 1+3 the developer ceases to be a fine gain developer, which you don't really need for PanF+ anyway, and should do a fine job of keeping the highlights in check.

    Ignore the Massive Development Chart. It is often good, but it is also often quite unreliable. Use it only as a last resort if you cannot find better information from the manufacturer. Here's the fact sheet for PanF+: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/download....6115811391.pdf .
    Frank Schifano

  2. #12

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    I saved the Ilford technical information download which is easier to read than what is inside the box. Thanks to everyone.

  3. #13
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    To get an appreciation of how to make a film and developer combination your own, look up the late Barry Thorton's site. He has veryygood understandable articles about personal film speed and personal film development testing regimes that yield good results without all sorts of extra fluff.
    my real name, imagine that.

  4. #14
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    If you're like me, no matter what anyone recommends, you're going to have to do your own tests to see what gives the results YOU want.

    None of the recommendations on PanF+ suited me and I was ready to give up on the film, but I had already bought a whole lot of it (I decline to answer why). Anyway, I didn't want to just get rid of the film, so I started experimenting with it and, wha'da'ya know, I found a combination that makes it useful to me. In fact, I'm getting some really nice negatives now.

    Anyway, good luck.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    I would not have selected Perceptol as my developer of choice for this film, but no matter. I'm sure good things can be done with it. Please do go to the Ilford site and follow their recommendations for development. Their recommendations are very good and quite comprehensive for this film. I usually develop PanF+ in D-76 diluted 1+3 according to Ilford's recommendation and the negatives are beautiful. PanF+ tends to want to build a lot of contrast, and is especially prone to blown highlights if you're not careful. The highly dilute D-76 (same exact thing as ID-11) takes care of that problem nicely.

    If you decide to use Perceptol full strength, realize that it can cost you about a stop of film speed because the of the developer's high solvent action. I'd recommend rating the film at EI 25 rather than box speed to preserve good shadow detail. At 1+3 the developer ceases to be a fine gain developer, which you don't really need for PanF+ anyway, and should do a fine job of keeping the highlights in check.

    Ignore the Massive Development Chart. It is often good, but it is also often quite unreliable. Use it only as a last resort if you cannot find better information from the manufacturer. Here's the fact sheet for PanF+: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/download....6115811391.pdf .
    Very interesting to know. From my past experience, I was getting very thin negatives with PanF, when shooting at box speed and developing in ID11 1:1 at the suggested time (which indicates the exact opposite to what you have experienced). I have some on order, so I might have have to experiment (& make sure I make good notes of what I have done)

  6. #16
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    Aste, while I agree with doing your own tests, it's nice to have some reference points. So what particular combination suited you? I've just started using Pan F and so far tried ID-11 1+1 with ok results.

    As per Frank's suggestion I should also try ID-11 1+3 which I would like to compare with the Perceptol 1+3.
    Last edited by johnnywalker; 05-13-2010 at 10:46 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    Very interesting to know. From my past experience, I was getting very thin negatives with PanF, when shooting at box speed and developing in ID11 1:1 at the suggested time (which indicates the exact opposite to what you have experienced). I have some on order, so I might have have to experiment (& make sure I make good notes of what I have done)
    Could be that your thermometer reads high, or could be that your agitation isn't as often or as vigorous as the way I do it. I know, I'm not in the "gentle agitation" camp. Five seconds of fairly vigorous agitation each thirty seconds does it for me. My thermometer is calibrated against a known good standard, and I take extra pains to maintain a constant temperature for the entire development cycle.
    Frank Schifano

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnywalker View Post
    Aste, while I agree with doing your own tests, it's nice to have some reference points. So what particular combination suited you? I've just started using Pan F and so far tried ID-11 1+1 with ok results.

    As per Frank's suggestion I should also try ID-11 1+3 which I would like to compare with the Perceptol 1+3.
    You're right. You will never know if you don't try them.

    Anyway, I'm still experimenting, but the best results I've gotten from PanF+, so far, is with it shot at EI-12 and developed in D-76 @ 1:3, for the time Ilford recommends for PanF+ shot at EI-50.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithy17 View Post
    I saved the Ilford technical information download which is easier to read than what is inside the box. Thanks to everyone.
    The best way to become proficient is to just use it. Over and over again.

    You will want to go out on a normal contrast day where the light is full and not too contrasty, and expose a roll of film by bracketing.
    Make your 'normal' exposure at box speed (50 for Pan-F+), and then shoot another at 25, a third at 100, and then find another scene and go again and again until you finish the roll.
    Process the roll at the manufacturer's established time. When the roll is dry you are well served to make a contact sheet of your film, and evaluate the frames and figure out where you think you have 'enough' shadow detail. (Keep in mind that nobody else can tell you what 'enough' shadow detail is, only you can tell yourself how much you like).
    This is how you figure out what film speed you shoot the frames at, and from that decide what your 'normal' film speed should be. It could be that you think you have too much at 25 and a hair too little at 50, so that you end up shooting at 40 or 32.
    During this process you want to completely disregard the highlights and mid-tones.

    Next step is to take another roll, shoot the same type of scenes at your chosen film speed, in the same type of lighting contrast. When you're done you develop one third of the film at a time. One at -30% of the recommended time, one exactly at the recommended time, and finally one at +30% of the recommended time. From these negatives you judge the highlights.

    After both those steps you will know at what film speed to shoot your film and for how long to develop it to get the results you want in normal contrast.

    And, now you will have tasted how you control your results and how exposure (for the most part) controls your shadow detail while developing (for the most part) determines your mid-tones and highlights.

    There is more to it than this, and you can take it further with some critical thinking, but this is a great way to get in the sweet spot of the film, and now you can continue tweaking for high contrast light and low contrast light. Adjust how you expose and develop your film based on what the lighting conditions are. Make contact prints at the same enlarger height, aperture, time, etc every time, and they will tell you if you need more or less exposure and/or more or less development time.
    Eventually you'll get it right every time, and then you can carry that experience on to testing other films if you desire.

    But there's no reason to change films or developer until you know this particular combination intimately.

    A hundred rolls into it you will have awesome knowledge of this film and developer combination, and you will be able to achieve almost any results with it as long as you keep an open mind and work hard at it. Take notes. Lots of notes. Document everything.

    And yes, contacting Bill Spears is a good thing. He is a really good photographer that knows what he's doing.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #20

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    I have sent Mr. Spears a private message as suggested. For some reason, it is not showing in the 'sent folder'. Has this function been disabled?

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