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  1. #1
    gma
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    Is Ilford SFX infrared?

    According to Ilford's website SFX 200 film has extended red sensitivity to 740 nm. Maco Cube 400 goes to 730. J&C Classic 200 and 400 are advertised to have a range to 720 nm and are classified as superpanchromatic emulsions. Has anyone comparison tested using dark red filtration? I wonder how much difference there actually is between 720 and 740 and if 740 is really approaching infrared.

    Maco IR goes to 820 nm and Kodak HIE to about 920 nm. I know they are true infrared emulsions.

  2. #2
    glbeas's Avatar
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    SFX just barely makes it into infrared, most hardcore IR shooters turn thier nose up at it for IR photography. It's good in it's own right though. Don't be afraid to try it with an R72 filter, you may have long exposures but the results will be fun.
    Gary Beasley

  3. #3
    jd callow's Avatar
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    It has great red sensitivity and mild (at best) ir sensitivity. With a red filter 25 or 29 it produces wonderfull results. The portraits of me on my web site (http://www.mrcallow.com*) were shot using SFX and a red #25 filter. On the plus side it is 'ir like' when used with a strong red filter and has better (as in smaller) grain than kodak's HIE, and is much faster than Mako (my spelling).

    *To see all of the portraits keep hitting links. the portaraits change as you click. Don't use the back button.

    *

  4. #4
    jim kirk jr.'s Avatar
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    in my experience,others may vary,Ilford sfx is at best what it claims to be-special effects.it can increase the tonality of a scene and add grain.on very bright days in the late spring,early summer(rich ir times)you can get semi-ir look.during the winter it increases tonality.It's best attribute is it is very forgiving in exposure(up to seven stops,or more)where most near infrared(konica)and infrared(maco)are usually only good for about four stops.with SFX to get any ir effects you need an 89b filter to se a good result(a #25 will generally be a slight increase in tonaltity)with konica(the cheapest of all the 35mm in the U.S.)Igenerally use an 89b to get the effects,although a #29 is good to-but it is a slow film-tripod needed and you need to pick subjects carefully(unforgiving in exposure)or your shadow areas will have no detail,so experiment and see how it is best for you.Maco 820c is my favorite of the group and produces good results,for me with either a 89b(rm72)or a#29 filter,with a #25 I usually get results simular to a regular bw film.It lies in between konica and kodak(also sfx)in grain and contrast,simular lattitude but be careful not to underexpose.
    Also each one has a different sensitivity curve and are not sensitive to the same colors in the same amts. so each has it own attributes.I say go out,have fun buy a roll or two of each and see which you like best.

    Jim
    "An object never performs the same function as its name or its image"-Rene Magritte

    "An image of a dog does not bite"-William James applied to photography

  5. #5
    Ka
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcallow
    It has great red sensitivity and mild (at best) ir sensitivity. With a red filter 25 or 29 it produces wonderfull results. The portraits of me on my web site (http://www.mrcallow.com*) were shot using SFX and a red #25 filter. On the plus side it is 'ir like' when used with a strong red filter and has better (as in smaller) grain than kodak's HIE, and is much faster than Mako (my spelling).....

    Very impressive. I will definitely give this film a go. How was it processed?

    ka

    I was all ready to drive to Rochester to see your work... until I realized it wasn't NY... blast!
    K. L. Taylor
    Black and White Studios

  6. #6
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ka
    Very impressive. I will definitely give this film a go. How was it processed?

    ka

    I was all ready to drive to Rochester to see your work... until I realized it wasn't NY... blast!
    Livinia Hanachiuc shot the pictures. I know she generally uses Microdol-x or d-76 both diluted 3-1 for most of her film, but couldn't tell you times or what speed she rates the film. I should be seeing her shortly and will ask.

    jdc

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  7. #7
    Ka
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    Thanks, jdc!
    K. L. Taylor
    Black and White Studios

  8. #8
    John_Brewer's Avatar
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    There I was thinking that was you in your avatar Mr C
    ~John~
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    www.johnbrewerphotography.com
    There are 10 types of people in this world - those who understand binary and those who don't.



 

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