Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,663   Posts: 1,481,658   Online: 808
      
Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Luseboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Marin, California (near San Francisco)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    252
    Images
    1

    Toning withe berg copper toner

    So I have recently made my own darkroom, and Its come to the point where id like to try some toning. I am most likely going to get some berg copper toner from calumet, but im wondering what the process of toning entails? how do you do it? from what i understand, you of course expose the paper under the enlarger, then develop, stop, fix, wash, then tone, and wash again? or do you dry after the first wash, and go back and tone? Id love any advice, recommendations, and anything you have to say about toning. And a recommendation of which toner to buy would be a good thing too, i like the idea of the berg because it allows for toning at different intervals.
    thanks,
    Austin

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    11,566
    Images
    59
    The berg copper toner is nice, but it functions more like a dye than other more traditional toners.

    As with most toners, you can decide which is more convenient for you - either tone as part of your processing workflow (after wash) or dry your prints and then re-wet and tone and re-wash on a later day.

    I prefer some of the more traditional toning processes (selenium, sepia, etc.) but the decision as to which you like most is incredibly subjective.

    One thing though, toners like this do not add any archival protection.

    If you can find a copy of Tim Rudman's Toning book, I would heartily recommend it.

    As an aside, most of the threads that discuss toning are found either in the alternative processes forum or the Black and White film and paper forums, so if you are looking for more info, it would be good to look there.

    Oh, and welcome to APUG
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #3
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,835
    Images
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by Luseboy View Post
    So I have recently made my own darkroom, and Its come to the point where id like to try some toning. I am most likely going to get some berg copper toner from calumet, but im wondering what the process of toning entails? how do you do it? from what i understand, you of course expose the paper under the enlarger, then develop, stop, fix, wash, then tone, and wash again? or do you dry after the first wash, and go back and tone? Id love any advice, recommendations, and anything you have to say about toning. And a recommendation of which toner to buy would be a good thing too, i like the idea of the berg because it allows for toning at different intervals.
    thanks,
    Austin
    If you want to start experimenting with toning you should pick up a bottle of Kodak Rapid Selenium Toner and go from there. Copper toning is actually quite easy but not suitable for general toning use. Sure it's a fun toner to experiment with, but Selenium is equally fun and most importantly: more useful.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin