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Thread: Efke100

  1. #11
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Dark red dye?--Very strange. Maybe it's the result of some chemical reaction with whatever you're processing it in, but if you presoak Efke PL100 (and I believe all three emulsions are the same), the water comes out blue/green.

  2. #12
    juan's Avatar
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    I've also used Efke PL100 in sheet film, and agree with what the others have said about it's fragileness. I, like Doug, had problems with it developing pinholes. It could be the water (we live in the same town) here. Or it could be temperature, as my tap water is seldom lower than 80F.

    I haven't had a problem with the pinholes since I did two things - I now use plain water for the stop bath, and I make sure the solution temperatures are consistent.

    I used Tri-X and HC110b for many years and liked it at the time. Since I've begun using PL100 and Pyrocat HD, I've never looked back for my view cameras. I am still looking for a 400 speed film for hand holding my Speed Graphic, so I may go back to Tri-X for that.

    I'd be interested in hearing how you like Efke 100 with HC110.
    juan

  3. #13
    Dorothy Blum Cooper's Avatar
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    I really appreciate the input here...Keep it comin'!

    I hope to get out (as soon as the rain lets up here) to work with this film. So far...I've loved the end result that I've seen.

    Dorothy--

  4. #14
    fingel's Avatar
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    I have had good results using a hardening fixer with Efke film. Fixer with hardener seems to have fallen out of favor, but I find it almost a necessity with the Efke emulsions. I usually process it 6 sheets at a time in a Jobo tank (but do it manually like smaller format roll film) and use PMK (no aftersoak) and Kodak Fixer with hardener and have never had a problem with scratches (knock on wood)
    Scott Stadler

  5. #15
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    When I tried Efke 100 in 35mm, I found that I had to rate it way down to get good shadow detail. I haven't seen this mentioned by others so it might just be related to my own processes and methods. Just thought I'd toss it in.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    When I tried Efke 100 in 35mm, I found that I had to rate it way down to get good shadow detail. I haven't seen this mentioned by others so it might just be related to my own processes and methods. Just thought I'd toss it in.
    I haven't tried the 35mm version, but the 120 and sheet film versions produce excellent shadow detail when developed in Pyrocat-HD with minimum and semi-stand agitation. You do need to expose for the shadows, of course.

    I do not find any need to use a hardening fixer with Efke 100. I use Photographer's Formulary TF-4 alkaline, non-hardening fixer.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  7. #17
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Tom Hoskinson]I haven't tried the 35mm version, but the 120 and sheet film versions produce excellent shadow detail when developed in Pyrocat-HD with minimum and semi-stand agitation. You do need to expose for the shadows, of course.QUOTE]

    I've never tried it. But doesn't that method tend to enhance the shadows anyway?

    I'm using rotary purely for convenience but I'm really not comfortable with it. It just seems to build up the highlights disproportionately so I find myself heavily overexposing and underdeveloping to try to compensate.

    Someday I'm gonna get me one of them fancy darkrooms, the kind with running water
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  8. #18

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    When I dump my presoak water (dark blue) into my used Pyrocat, I turns dark red.
    Paul Hamann

  9. #19

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    I can't speak much for Efke100, but I use Macophot Up100+, which is said to be the same emulsion, or a very similar one.
    The film, like efke, is very fragile, even when dry. An old TRL I previously used made small but regular gashes into the emulsion (probably due to old rolers). The pentacon six I now use made caused some scratches in a few rolls, but I think that is mostly due to the extremely dusty enviroment I was in...

    I dry my film in stainless steel reels (hair drier & PVC tube set up), and if the film touches the inside of the reel (like that clip thing), it causes holes in the emulsion as well.

    Having said that, it is great film. I shot it at e.i. 200, developed in Diafine. Looking back, I should have shot it at 100 or so, since my film is at least a stop underexposed. Some frames require selenium toning, some don't. You can check out the critique gallery to see what the result looks like (very good to my eyes). The tone is simply amazing, and grain is very small on a 9x9" print (6x6cm neg, though). From severely underexposed negs, that is amazing.

    The dye on my film is blue. A deep purple on a water rinse, or a cyan color on diafine bath A (no water rinse).

    Well, hope this helps you out. Although the film is not perfect, it is very worth the trouble.

  10. #20
    Snapper's Avatar
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    I appear to be colourblind.

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