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Thread: Efke100

  1. #21
    titrisol's Avatar
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    What speed (EI) did you get by using Diafine?

    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk
    Use it in 2X3 & 4X5 formats and am considering switching to it also for 120mm. Only problems I've had with it is in development occasionally getting bubbles in negative. Been developing in 2 yr old Diafine & not paying much attention to water temp. Am switching to Rodinal & semi-stand for hopefully more consistent results.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  2. #22

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    Pinholes.

    Going through some of my 4x5 negatives, some early ones had pinholes. My latest ones don't.

    The early ones were Tri-X, and the later ones APX 100. But, the last ones were processed using a water rinse after developer rather than an acid stop bath, and also used alkaline fixer.

    I suspect that the gas released during alkaline developer hitting acid stop bath or fixer may cause the pinholes.

    The first time I tray developed an 8x10 negative, I gouged the negative with a fingernail. It was in the acid hardening fixer. Supposedly the negative is softest in the alkaline baths (developer) and harder in the fixer, but that's not at all what my tactile senses were telling me. The negative felt softer when it went into the fixer.

    I haven't tried Efke sheet films yet, but I've had no scratches nor soft negatives when using the alkaline fixer combined with a water rinse after developer.

    For 4x5 I use Jobo tank with inversion agitation. Takes lots of developer, but it works easily.

    Charlie

  3. #23
    James Bleifus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Francesco
    Dorothy, my only experience with Efke 100 is their sheet film. Best film I have ever used. It is very fragile (easily scratched or gouged) but well worth the effort and, in my opinion, minimal expense. Nearly 80 percent of the images in my website are from Efke 100 negatives.
    Well, drat, drat and drat. I was hoping to prove Francesco wrong, not because I have some sort of disagreement with him, but because I hate how easily Efke 100 scratches (at one point I became so angry that I threw my remaining Efke in the garbage, only to dig it out a few days later. It never quite smelled the same afterwards. Throwing away film just doesn't feel right, sort of like burning books.), but I've since tried HP5, J&C Classic 200 and Arista.edu 400 and Efke 100 shames them all. Looks like I'll be using Efke 100 for as long as J&C sells it and developing it one sheet at a time.

    Cheers,

    James

  4. #24
    noseoil's Avatar
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    If your are using PMK as a developer, the hardening fixer really isn't necessary. PMK (the pyrogallic acid component) acts as a hardening developer. It reacts with the gelatin and has a hardening effect.

  5. #25
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Dorothy,

    I can't really say anything about the sheet film, as I haven't tried it yet. But I can tell you that I've had a great time using it in 35mm and 120.
    My primary developer is Rodinal, and I like 1+50 and 1+100 dilutions. With this developer I have had best success rating the film at E.I.50, one stop over-exposure.
    With that said, I quite succesfully (!) mistook a roll of Efke 100 for HP5 and rated it at E.I.400. After some serious overdeveloping, I got some pretty good looking negatives! So, this film is extremely flexible in my opinion, with some great exposure latitude. It also responds well to different developing cycles with adjustments for tonal range and contrast.
    Lately I've started using Agfa APX and Kodak TMX a lot instead of Efke, simply because of the scratching tendencies - especially in combination with a non-hardening alkaline fixer. I think that's basically the only negative aspect of this film, however, and if you are very careful, you may never experience any problems.
    One more thing, if you try 35mm, make sure to load your camera in at least subdued light, as the film canisters are not the most light proof devices on earth.

    Good luck with trying Efke out. It is beautiful stuff!

    - Thomas
    Saint Paul, MN
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #26
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I've found that I can minimize scratching with these more fragile films by using more careful technique--more solution in the tray than I would otherwise use, surgical glove on my shuffling hand to prevent scratching from my fingernails, pulling the sheet straight out from the bottom all the way before lifting, working a little more slowly and deliberately, more sheets per batch so that each sheet is handled less--but there are still very fine abrasions sometimes that could become visible in an enlargement. So for 4x5" I use a Nikor tank and I've acquired deep tanks and hangers for 5x7", but I'll still be doing 8x10" and 11x14" in trays.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #27

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    Pre-soak

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson
    I agree with Francesco and David - Efke 100 is a great film! I have shot a lot of it as 120 roll film. I also shoot it in 4x5 and recently in 8x10 sheet sizes. I expose and process it the same way in all 3 formats. Like Francesco, I develop it in Pyrocat-HD. I also pre-soak in water for 2 minutes.

    New to this film. What do you pre-soak it in? Same temp as the developer? I have noticed the softness as well and ruined a roll last week as i attempted to squeegee it after processing.

  8. #28
    James Bleifus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    I've found that I can minimize scratching with these more fragile films by using more careful technique--[snip] more sheets per batch so that each sheet is handled less--[snip] but I'll still be doing 8x10" and 11x14" in trays.
    Thanks David. I've tried most of your suggestions already with no luck. The truth is I'm a klutz in the darkroom. The one thing I haven't tried is more sheets per batch. In fact, I've been trying to move the opposite direction and develop fewer sheets at once, but your approach makes more sense. I'll take some test pictures and see what happens. Thanks for the suggestion.

    Cheers,

    James

  9. #29

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    Unohuu,

    Pre-soak in water, and yes, it should be the same temp as your other chemicals. If I were you, I'd lose that squeegee. I just give my film a final soak in Photo-Flo, then hang it up. Occasionally I'll have to re-rinse it to get rid of spots, but that's rare, and IMHO it beats dragging anything over the soft emulsion.
    "If You Push Something Hard Enough, It Will fall over" - Fudd's First Law of Opposition

  10. #30
    Aggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Bennett
    Unohuu,

    Pre-soak in water, and yes, it should be the same temp as your other chemicals. If I were you, I'd lose that squeegee. I just give my film a final soak in Photo-Flo, then hang it up. Occasionally I'll have to re-rinse it to get rid of spots, but that's rare, and IMHO it beats dragging anything over the soft emulsion.
    I agree completely on this. I was taught to do the final wipe of the negatives before hanging to dry, and have had countless rolls ruined by some dust particles being on the photo wipe strips. Since i stopped doing that final wipe, I have not had a roll become scratched.

    As to the sheet film if you want to do more sheets per batch there is a trick of using a wire tray inside of a larger tray to hold the sheets. Gordon Hutchings uses one to do 4 sheets of 4x5 in an 8x10 tray. Some here have in the past talked about a slosher tray. I haven't seen one, but all who have used them swear by them.
    Non Digital Diva

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