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  1. #21
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    actually used the original 777 developer and recommends the formula in Ed's site
    Does he? Read it carefully. Fred says, "It seems like you have it." Then a little later on he says, "None of us had any interest in making it ourselves, but what was in it was a constant question." That sounds to me like they never really knew what was in it exactly. He never states that he's used Ed's formula, although he does mention that he started with Defender 5-D.

    In any case, the Bluegrass stuff is terrific developer, whatever's in it. You can't go wrong with it. It does behave to me as if it has glycin in it. The closest I've come with any other developer is FX-2, which has those 'glycin grays' and is a good stand developer.

    Let us know how your negatives print, Tim. Who knows? Maybe you'll improve on it.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3
    The closest I've come with any other developer is FX-2, which has those 'glycin grays' and is a good stand developer.
    Those attributes are shared by Agfa 8 and diluted Ansco 130 (1:20).
    Tom Hoskinson
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  3. #23
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    FYI-for those who want some sample images done with the Bluegrass formula~~

    http://homepage.mac.com/dmdorn_ct_usa/PhotoAlbum4.html
    "Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect."

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by garryl
    FYI-for those who want some sample images done with the Bluegrass formula~~
    Yes, seen those before - the Classic Pan 400 looks like...well, Classic Pan 400.

    Sure would like to see some comparative test data...
    Tom Hoskinson
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  5. #25
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    so would I. But at 4 gallons a shipment, I don't think it will be me. }:^)>
    "Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect."

  6. #26

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    I received a four gallon case of 777 panthemic developer last week ans was able to do a little film testing with Delta 100. So far I find a IE of 80 with development time of 7'30"
    with 15 sec initial agitation then 3 inversions per 30 sec @ 24 C. The results were outstanding - extreme acuity, superfine grain. smooth tonality, excellent highlight and shadow detail.
    By the way, what were the specifics of your development of TMY ?

  7. #27

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    In 1940, Morris Germain, ARPS, Published a little book titled: Darkroom Handbook and Formulary. On page 86 under "Other Finegrain Formulas" is the following:

    "Finegrain Developer"

    "The following is the author's own finegrain formula. Many of his friends and former students are using it with consistently good results."

    Distilled water (125 deg. F) 665 ml
    Metol 7.0 grams
    Sodium Sulfite, anhydrous 70.0 grams
    Paraphenylene Diamine (base) 7.0 grams
    Glycin 7.0 grams
    Distilled water, cold, to make 1000 ml

    "Use without dilution at 65 deg. F. Developing times: Slow film 10 minutes, fast film 15 minutes. Developing time can be changed to meet individual requirements. For replenisher, use the same formula. Enlargements of 15 to 25 diameters, dependent on the film speed, can be made without showing grain. Its keeping qualities are practically inexhaustible."
    Last edited by Tom Hoskinson; 08-08-2004 at 11:19 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  8. #28
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    Gee Tom where were you during the debate on Photo.net- just kidding? Everyone was looking for just such a source as it was speculated Morris was the father of the 777 formula. Thanks for the info!
    "Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect."

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by garryl
    Gee Tom where were you during the debate on Photo.net- just kidding? Everyone was looking for just such a source as it was speculated Morris was the father of the 777 formula. Thanks for the info!
    Thanks, garryl!

    First, I had to find (and buy) the reference. Morris Germain's "Handbook" is a very interesting little book. It is one of the LITTLE TECHNICAL LIBRARY books published in 1940 by the Ziff-Davis Publishing Company.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson
    In 1940, Morris Germain, ARPS, Published a little book titled: Darkroom Handbook and Formulary. On page 86 under "Other Finegrain Formulas" is the following:

    "Finegrain Developer"
    "

    yep, this is it. I am letting you all know I haven't abandoned this thread. I have been using this developer for a couple weeks now. I still have to get my act together and do the testing on Classic200 from J&C. So far it looks great with a development time of 7 minutes at 78 degrees. Yes, I work rather slow, I did get the 4x5 Classic200 out of the fridge yesterday and will do the BTZS tests, maybe tonight. Work has it's nasty habit of getting in the way of fun so sometimes it takes awhile.

    The other films I have an idea of testing this with are HP5 (for my 2x3 sheet film) and Efke25 (for 4x5). I plan on standardizing at 75 degrees as this is well within the useful range of the developer and it easy to get to that temperature summer or winter around here.

    And yes, as reported, the stuff smells odd but good.


    tim in san jose

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