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  1. #11
    clayne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    Three chemicals and you've a lith developer. Hydroquinone,
    sodium sulfite, and sodium carbonate in the correct proportions
    are all that is needed. You've the chemicals on hand? If interested
    I'll post some for starters suggestions. Dan
    Dan I think you're missing a few ingredients. Take a look at the ld-20 msds and you'll notice that in addition to lye, there's a bit more than that:

    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/pdf/msds/fotospeed/LD20_Lith_Deveveloper.pdf

    Part B is halfway down.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  2. #12

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    Maybe One

    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Dan I think you're missing a few ingredients.
    Potassium bromide may or may not be needed although
    I don't recall using it while doing some lith printing
    several years ago. Dan

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    Potassium bromide may or may not be needed although
    I don't recall using it while doing some lith printing
    several years ago. Dan
    Okay, and what about potassium hydroxide or the glycol?

    The chemicals you stated ("Hydroquinone, sodium sulfite, and sodium carbonate") sound perfectly find for something like Dektol (in fact that pretty much is Dektol that you described) but as we all know, Dektol isn't even close to a lith developer.

    Granted, it's all about proportion of chemicals to manipulate developer activity, but I think there's a bit more than that needed. On the flip-side, it appears Easylith is mostly HQ, glycol, and potassium carbonate.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  4. #14

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    So totally depends on the paper (er, emulsion). Starting over again, with a giant stash of good lithable paper, I would most definitely mix my own developers.

    And it is basically (or, elementary, depending on your take) what danq said. This stuff is not rocket surgery. Stoicheometry yes, rocket surgery no.

  5. #15

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    The Secret

    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Okay, and what about potassium hydroxide or the glycol?

    The chemicals you stated ("Hydroquinone, sodium sulfite, and
    sodium carbonate") sound perfectly find for something like Dektol
    (in fact that pretty much is Dektol that you described) but as we all
    know, Dektol isn't even close to a lith developer.

    Granted, it's all about proportion of chemicals to manipulate
    developer activity, but I think there's a bit more than that
    needed. On the flip-side, it appears Easylith is mostly
    HQ, glycol, and potassium carbonate.
    The very high ph of a hydroxide is not needed. The
    glycol? The entire News Paper industry for generations
    existed as we know it because of lith developers. Many
    variations exist catering to many emulsions, work
    conditions, keeping qualities etc.

    The secret is the extremely low level of sulfite needed.
    Ordinarily hydroquinone is, after a manor, rejuvenated
    so acts in it's usual way. As sulfite levels drop below
    2% hydroquinone reduces the halides of silver
    infectiously.

    To learn more, via Google search for lith formulas.
    Once there read "What Lith Developers Do". Dan

  6. #16

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    Dan,

    Have you used any of the commercial formulas? I can mix my own solutions but a "ready in the bottle" product is a convenience.

    Tom

  7. #17

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    Committed to Home Brew

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kershaw View Post
    Dan, Have you used any of the commercial formulas?
    I can mix my own solutions but a "ready in the bottle"
    product is a convenience. Tom
    No I've not used any commercial products. Any product
    off the shelf is based upon hydroquinone's infectious
    development in a very low sulfite environment.

    I'll likely get back to compounding my own although for
    the near future my time available for darkroom work
    is very limited. I'd like to explore the developer as
    a global contrast control. Have you done any
    exploring along those lines? Perhaps lith
    then bleach then redevelop? Or even
    re-lith. Dan

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    No I've not used any commercial products. Any product
    off the shelf is based upon hydroquinone's infectious
    development in a very low sulfite environment.

    I'll likely get back to compounding my own although for
    the near future my time available for darkroom work
    is very limited. I'd like to explore the developer as
    a global contrast control. Have you done any
    exploring along those lines? Perhaps lith
    then bleach then redevelop? Or even
    re-lith. Dan
    Not as yet. Processing ILFORD MGWT in a standard PQ developer, bleaching, and then redeveloping in a lith developer is planned, as suggested by Tim Rudman.

    Tom

  9. #19
    Schlapp's Avatar
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    Does anyone know the keeping properties if Rollewi-Creative Lith - unmixed please? I'm thinking of buying 5l of the stuff but don't want it to go off!
    thanks

  10. #20
    ath
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    I dont know about this specific developer but once W. Moersch stated that lith developers should keep nearly indefinite. I think he was observing no measurable change after several years of storage with his developer.
    I would store the 5l in several glass bottles though.
    Last edited by ath; 11-28-2012 at 09:14 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Regards,
    Andreas

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