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  1. #11

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    I happen to agree with Aggie on the paranoia issue when using PF. I use it everyday and over the years have had a few accidents with it that caused me to panic and call the poison control center in the city and Kodak. Both informed me that at the concentrations that were being used (4oz of water mixed with enough PF to cover the head of a wet Qtip) that there was no concern for alarm. I have read the book mentioned and yes all should be cautious with the handeling of the chemistry that is used. But we should all be realistic as well.

  2. #12
    ann
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    thank you Clay, i was just beginning to response to this latest "remark".
    That book which was printed in 83 was highly suspect them as is now.

    We work with a lot of "dangerous chemicals", and common sense calls for being smart and having respect for our tools. It does't mean we should not tone, bleach, do alternative process, etc. Nor, does the use of these products mean we are "a bull in the china cabinet", rather we choose to be prudent and work with these tools with intelligence and respect.

  3. #13
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    Thanks Clay, Jim, and Ann. Knowing your backgrounds, I appreciate your responses. I was not advocating NOT taking proper precautions. I have heard so many claims of things being bad over the years that have later been proven to be false, yet once they had been labeled so, the stigma followed forever. Kinda like the dihydromonoxide scare recently in southern California.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by happysnapper
    I do believe that you would have your face right down on your print in order to see what you are doing. I don't suppose you have a scale for the proximity effect, but then again, you will probably make something up.
    IF you use a large opaque white plexiglass sheet to adhere (with water suction) your print for bleaching, You can also add a nice light source that will shine from the back (it can be to one side pointed at the sheet from behind so that it doesn't have to sit in the sink, or any other numerous ways of shining a light from behind) you are thus illuminating the entire print and work area. At no time do you need to get your face right down on the print. If the eye sight of the person is that bad, I suggest getting some glassses or better yet those magnifying lens shades like an optivisor. Most people would have difficulty focusing with their node on the print.

  5. #15
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    Barnbaum's fingers are all still there, and he's not twitching so given people call him the Acid King I suppose it's pretty safe stuff.
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    "civility is not a sign of weakness" JFK

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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by ann
    thank you Clay, i was just beginning to response to this latest "remark".
    That book which was printed in 83 was highly suspect them as is now.

    This book was revised and reissued in 1991, endorsed by countless medical experts, Eastman House, several public school health departments, and that fly by night organization, the Friends of Photography, where several workshops on hazards in photographic workplaces were held...

    We work with a lot of "dangerous chemicals", and common sense calls for being smart and having respect for our tools. It does't mean we should not tone, bleach, do alternative process, etc. Nor, does the use of these products mean we are "a bull in the china cabinet", rather we choose to be prudent and work with these tools with intelligence and respect.
    And don't worry Clay, Jim and Ann, I was not trying to say anything abstract about Aggie's points. I even agreed with her if you noticed. A general comment that is parallel to all of yours about using some common sense and following safe work habits in no way closely implies the doom of toning or alternate process. In fact, I believe that by practicing safety and good sense of craft, you might even be around longer to continue making images.

    As for being an alarmist, I don't know about that term. Cautious maybe. Something about knowing the materials you handle I guess. You guys amaze me sometimes...

    I'm off to look for WMD's.
    Last edited by Sean; 07-23-2004 at 12:57 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: slight moderation
    Do not question what you have not done, question what you will not try.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie
    IF you use a large opaque white plexiglass sheet to adhere (with water suction) your print for bleaching, You can also add a nice light source that will shine from the back (it can be to one side pointed at the sheet from behind so that it doesn't have to sit in the sink, or any other numerous ways of shining a light from behind) you are thus illuminating the entire print and work area.
    Now I need to ask this....
    If the white plexiglass sheet is opaque, why light it from behind? And why would you want to do that anyhow?

    Just really wondering.
    Do not question what you have not done, question what you will not try.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by happysnapper
    Now I need to ask this....
    If the white plexiglass sheet is opaque, why light it from behind? And why would you want to do that anyhow?

    Just really wondering.
    Well gosh golly gee whiz. Seems both EricR and I took the workshop at the same time where the setup was used. Bruce Barnbaum uses it daily in his work.
    Last edited by Aggie; 07-23-2004 at 01:24 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: wrong spelling

  9. #19
    ann
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    I have been doing darkroom work for 57 years and since the age of 21 have had only 6 sick days and that due to surgery. I do have a serious problem with being fingerprinted, all that chemistry for so many years . However, i also know about the chemicals i am using and do use gloves for all toning process and developers i.e PMK.and other toxic chemicals so how you gather i was not knowledable about practicing standard work habits involving toxic materials is beyond me. As an aside I intend on being around and printing for at least another 50 years, with or without WMD's.
    Last edited by Sean; 07-23-2004 at 12:57 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: removed snippet related to a previous post moderation

  10. #20
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    I put in a call to an old professor of mine at the University of Arizona (yeah in your neighborhood Robert) I just got the return phone call. The scoop on the toxcity of potassium ferricyanide is this: Yes a toxic gas can be given off from this compound if it is mixed with a strong (HCL or hyrdrochloric acid) acid. When mixed with water, no lethal or life threatening gas is produced. The metal cyanides, iron, cobalt and nickle are the most stable of all the cyanides. He suggested that you wear gloves and work with ventilation. Not for fear of some gas being given off, but as just good lab practices. He also told me not to go sniffing the powder.

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