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  1. #11
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Tom

    Thank you for giving Andre the names of suppliers of Pot Bromide, living in England I don't know the US suppliers.

    John,

    Try only one ar any combination until you get the result you want. Many problems in photography are sorted by using combinations of little dodges such as the exposure and development one and the Pot Brom one.Another dodge that I use to increase contrast is to add Benzotriazole to my developer to help increase contrast but it also cools down the print colour.

    Andre

    You need to make a 10% solution of Pot Bromide by mixing 10gr bromide to 100ml water, whilst not a true 10% sol'n it is near enough and if you always mix these proportions you are being consistent and will get repeatable results. Add 10 to 15 ml of this sol'n to any developer but be careful not to overdo it for you will run the risk of getting a green caste on your print and could induce a huge loss of contrast. My suggestion is to start by making a print with no added bromide and then add 10ml and make a 2nd print and then add another 5ml, make a 3rd print and so on. Eventually you will get a green cast and flatten the contrast but it is a good way to learn how far to go with these things and you will see how much bromide to add to give you the result that you like. I see you said you needed all the contrast you can get because the negs are thin, have you made prints on grade 5, if not try. Also, you may want to try adding lith developer to your normal print developer, it will certainly increase the contrast. Lith dev comes in two solutions, one of them with sodium hydroxide in it, usually the B developer, and it is this one that you add, say 50ml as a starter.

  2. #12
    ann
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    the developer i refered to is made by Edwal and is a standard paper developer. They may have changed the name from Super Platinum to Platinum II.

  3. #13

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    Ann, you are correct it is Platinum II now..a side note, you could try Rodinal 1:10, with MGWT it gives a nice warm look much like Platinum II and the prints tone well with Viradon. Have not done any other testing with different dilutions/paper/toners but think this might be a nice paper developer as well.
    Last edited by photomc; 07-24-2004 at 08:27 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: because my fingers think they know what I want to say...
    Mike C

    Rambles

  4. #14

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    thanks for all the responses....

    Les, I am already printing at about a grade 5. My enlarger has a dichro head, so precise grading is hard to get. I am printing at 170 magenta, the max contrast I can get. The Agfa literature indicates that a grade 5 in their paper is 200 magenta, and ARISTA.EDU lit says that for their paper 150 is grade 5. I still printed at 170 for a few frames, and 150 for others. I'll probably stick to 170 for all of them, though.

    The Pot Bromide sounds good. For about 11 bucks I can get a pound of it, which should last a LONG, LONG time. The lith developer sounds very tempting, but at 30 dollars its over my budget.

    I've emailed freestyle, hopefully I'll have an answer soon. But LPD with Bromide might be a good way to go. 7 bucks for 6 to 8 gallons of developer is hard to beat...

    I looked at the Edwal Platinum, and its just too expensive compared to LPD. Freestyle sells it for 35 (because of their one size fits all shipping), Adorama for 15... LPD is still the champ.

    Once again, thank you all for your help.

  5. #15
    Aggie's Avatar
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    Andre, I take it the potassium ferricyanide was used to clean the metal plates and such at the newspaper. Quick note on that, they mix that soultion using acid. Yes it will be corrsive then. Mixed in water it is not corrosive. what the hazard is of potassium ferricyanide that is mentioned in the msds sheets is the powedered cyrstal form. If you breath it, it will cause lung problems. Just don't sniff it. As for being corrisve, you are not mixing it with acid, and the minute amounts you will be using you can spill on your hand and not be burnt at all. You just don't want to get it on you and possibly ingest it by picking up something to eat while it is on your hand. It all comes down to common sense, and real knowledge of what you are working with. gloves and good ventilation should be used at all times no matter what chemical. There are many items out there that we work with around the house that are far worse than the photo chemicals we use. Laundry bleach, Household cleanser, paint, Dr. Pepper and many more. Educate yourself on the full information about the product and don't fear it.

  6. #16

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    Thanks for the info, Aggie. In the near future I will be improving my darkroom, adding proper ventilation is on the list. As of right now, my ventilation is an open window, with cardboard, blinds, and black out on top. It freshens the air, but isnt ideal...
    Maybe when my darkroom is re-done I'll consider more chemicals, including bleach. I appreciate the info, though.

    Jdef, Thanks for those links, they will be life-savers. As soon as I settle down on developer and bromide, etc... I'll test my filtration.

    Thank you all again,

  7. #17
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    I presume this paper does not have developer incorporated, but take a little piece of it and immerse it in strong carbonate solution under room light just to see if my presumption is correct.

    Old formulas for warm tone developers include a high ratio of hydroquinone and little sulfite. You can try adding a bunch of hydroquinone to the developer you have been using after diluting it more than usual. The bromide will help too. It may require longer printing exposure as well.
    Gadget Gainer

  8. #18

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    The little bit of research I've done suggests that Arista.EDU is indeed Forté Polygrade V: the color filtration values suggested for both papers are indentical, for example, as are the developers and the predicted tones, along with toners...

    Forté Polygrade is not developer incorporated, so neither should the .EDU paper be. I don't have any Potassium Carbonate on hand, so I can't test that out.

    Having given the prints some time to "grow" on me, the neutral tone does not bother me as much. This reminds me of a time I bought 250 sheets of 8x10 forté RC, which when developed in Ilford Universal Paper developer produced tones WAY too cold. It took me a few sheets to get used to it (I only used it for contact sheets and proofs anyhow). I suspect the .EDU paper would react the same way...

    Anyway, Freestyle hasn't answered yet, but I'm not too worried about it.

    But I have to ask this:

    Has anyone ever used this:

    Brown Tone Print Developer (Agfa-120)
    http://www.jackspcs.com/pd120.htm

    I haven't run the formula through my calculator, but if it's long lasting, it might be another option...

  9. #19

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    Ok, the best "bang for the buck" scenario with the Agfa-120 developer is buying 10lbs of Pot Carbonate, 3lbs of Hidroquinone, and 10lbs of Sodium Sulfite (I'd need 7.5), which comes to $108.80 and yields a little over 56L of developer. that's about $2 per L. Plus shipping

    LPD costs $6.99 and yields 22.8L at a 1:6 dilution. That is about $0.30 per L. shipping would be 5-6 bucks max.

    EDIT:

    and then there's photog's formulary 106... $21.5 for 16 liters, or $1.35 per L.

    BTW, I'm posting these things in the hopes that it will be useful to someone else, but I''d also like to hear people's experiences with these developers (particularly with neutral tone papers). Thanks

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre R. de Avillez
    But I have to ask this:

    Has anyone ever used this:

    Brown Tone Print Developer (Agfa-120)
    http://www.jackspcs.com/pd120.htm

    I haven't run the formula through my calculator, but if it's long lasting, it might be another option...
    Yes, Agfa-120 is essentially identical to Agfa Neutol WA. This is a hydoquinone/sulfite/carbonate developer. It is often used in split development to control/manipulate image tone and contrast.

    The Stock Solution formula is:
    Water (125F) ---------------- 750ml
    Sodium Sulfite ---------------- 60 grams
    Hydroquinone ---------------- 24 grams
    Potassium Carbonate ---------- 80 grams
    Cold water to make ------------ 1 liter

    Dilute 1:5 for warm black tones
    Dilute 1:4 for brown-black tones

    If you add about 5 grams of Potassium Bromide per liter of the working solution it will yield neutral to brown tones, depending on the paper.

    This would be an ideal developer to split into 2 (or 3) stock solutions to maximize shelf life.

    (A) Dissolve the Hydroquinone in 500ml of Propylene Glycol.

    (B) Dissolve the Sulfite, and Carbonate in 500 ml water.

    (C) Dissolve 25 grams of Potassium Bromide in water to make 100ml (approx. 25% solution).

    For a 1:5 working solution take 1 part A plus 1 part B plus 5 parts water.

    For a browner tone, add 2ml of C per liter of the working solution (as a starting point).
    Tom Hoskinson
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