Switch to English Language Passer en langue franÁaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,312   Posts: 1,536,666   Online: 799
      
Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 69

Thread: Water quality

  1. #11
    Dave Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Middle England
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,894
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    If the collection pan is kept scrupulously clean dehumidifier water should be perfect. Think about it, it is water that comes from the air, much like...well, rain. One of the purest kind of water known.
    Not sure about that - ever heard of Acid Rain? Our Scandinavian contributors may like to comment on the "purity" of water that's washed our air supply.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  2. #12
    Dave Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Middle England
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,894
    Images
    2
    Iím thinking about this water thing further, whilst I drink my pollutant laden wake-up cup of coffee.
    As far as the photographic process goes I donít believe water quality is that important! Certainly it has to be reasonably neutral, so that rules out the acid rain. The nearer the Ph is to 7 the better, but provided itís drinkable itís o.k. I imagine the important thing here is consistency. As for dissolved solids, apart from making up pyro developer, I donít know that itís worth the trouble of using distilled or excessively filtered water for print making Ė film developing, at least the final wash, needs water free of junk. Thatís the only reason I use Tescoís instead of tap water for my final film wash.
    Incidentally, and on a slightly different tack, I wonder how many of us simple hang our negatives from a line to dry, where they gather airborne dust and debris in the process? Now thatís an area where I could improve, and thereby reduce my spotting time.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Miller
    Not sure about that - ever heard of Acid Rain? Our Scandinavian contributors may like to comment on the "purity" of water that's washed our air supply.
    Yeah, I have heard of it...so? just because your rain is contaminated does not mean it is how it started......the process of distillation (essentially what causes rain water) produces the purest form of water, after that, whatever is added by the surrouding environment, it is a different question.

  4. #14
    gainer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,726
    Images
    2
    IIRC, acid rain is what happens when there are things such as SO2 in the air that the rain is falling through. CO2 is always there. The accumulated effect on some building materials and on automobile fenders is apparent. I think that if you can breathe that air, the acidity as far as photo processes are concerned is not great. If your humidifier or rain water is too bad, you can taste it. pH may be below neutral, but very little of the photo chemical goes into countering it. At least, it is not likely to cause the cloudy solutions and precipitates that hard water does. Chlorine and fluorine are not friendly to developers that have ascorbates, but you won't find those halogens in humidifier water that comes from breathable air.
    Gadget Gainer

  5. #15
    Stan. L-B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    London & Friars Cliff Dorset UK
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    342
    Images
    1
    Yes! I use Britta water filtration when working away from home, living and travelling in my RV in remote areas. I carry distilled water for mixing, and use the Britta filtered water for washes. It seem to work very well for me, no nasties on the film after drying. I do use a little wetting agent in the final wash.
    'Determine on some course more than a wild exposure to each chance' The Bard.

  6. #16
    Shmoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    972
    Images
    11
    Thanks for all the input. It's sort of amazing how many problems we all have with water. It almost makes you afraid to take a bath or drink coffee, much less mix chemicals and clear film!!!

    Thanks again!
    Shmoo

  7. #17
    FrankB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Northwest UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,147
    Images
    24
    I live in a hard water area and had really bad problems with particles (calcium carbonate or something else) being left on my negs during processing. I got hold of a Britta jug filter and now put all film processing and washing water through it (after mixing it to 20C in the sink). No more particles.

    The downside is that it does add significantly to the length of time the prep-process-wash cycle takes; a major drag as it's my least favourite part of photography and, as a DDX user (Ilford *why* won't you do it it smaller bottles than 1 litre?!!), tend to batch process anything up to about 15 rolls at a time...!
    The destination is important, but so is the journey

  8. #18
    RJS
    RJS is offline

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Southern Cal
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    246
    Dr. Richard Henry, M.D. Ph.D. , unfortunately no longer with us, in his book "Controls in Black and Whit Photography" indicates that water quality doesn't make all that much difference. This is a teriffic book, and anyone seriously in b&w photography-processing etc. will find a great deal of very useful information.He did the research, and tells how to replicate it. Very very few of the so-called 'authorities' do that. Mostly they repeat others without checking. Oh well!

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    196
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Miller
    I would depend how clean the air was that had been dehumidified.
    That water from the dehumidified is pure distilled water. It is the condensate from the air in your basement or other space because it leaves behind all the other ellements and just pulles the moisture from the air. I been using it for years, just run it though a coffee filter to get out some particals that may have fallen in the water.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    463
    Images
    6
    "As far as the photographic process goes I donít believe water quality is that important!"

    You haven't talked with the Kodak tech guys about Xtol, have you?

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  ó   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin