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  1. #11
    fhovie's Avatar
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    Thank you Thank you Thank you

    I just went to Sandy's post on Michael and Paula's web page and tried a semi-stand process. I had a roll of APX100 120 film shot at ASA 100. I would have developed it in 1:1:100 at 70F for 12 minutes. Instead I tried 1:1:150 for 20 minutes with 1.5 minutes initial agitation and 10 seconds at 5, 10 and 15 minutes. The densities are good for enlarging and I see no place in the negs where the shadows dropped out. I look forward to making some prints - I think this is the answer. I will soon try the same (relative adjusted) times on HP5 and TRI-X and see what happens. Looks very promising.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by fhovie
    I just went to Sandy's post on Michael and Paula's web page and tried a semi-stand process. I had a roll of APX100 120 film shot at ASA 100. I would have developed it in 1:1:100 at 70F for 12 minutes. Instead I tried 1:1:150 for 20 minutes with 1.5 minutes initial agitation and 10 seconds at 5, 10 and 15 minutes. The densities are good for enlarging and I see no place in the negs where the shadows dropped out. I look forward to making some prints - I think this is the answer. I will soon try the same (relative adjusted) times on HP5 and TRI-X and see what happens. Looks very promising.
    Frank,

    I am glad this method worked well for you. You will find that negatives nade with the semi-stand method of agitation will have incredible apparent sharpness, and with the four agitation periods during development there should be no problem with uneven development, even with difficult subjects that have a lot of even tone areas such as skies, etc.

    Just to reiterate what someone else stated earlier, I would not recommend the 2:2:100 dilution of Pyrocat-HD for silver printing. With most films the processing times would be very, very short and this might lead to uneven development with methods of development.

    Sandy
    Last edited by sanking; 07-26-2004 at 03:17 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13
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    I did not mean to imply that Pyrocat-HD is an example of infectious development. I meant that I do not find a correlation between coarse grain and apparent sharpness. I have seen sharpness with fine grain and apparent sharpness with coarse grain. I will not automatically assume that of two developers, the one with coarser grain will have the higher apparent sharpness. The role of sulfite is also not to be automatically assumed. I have seen developers with and without sulfite with fine and coarse grain and with high an low resolution and with high and low sharpness in just about all possible combinations.

    We tend to pidgeon-hole developer constituents, forgetting that a synergistic pair should be treated as a new entity whose characteristics are not a simple linear combination of its constituents. I read where people who should know better believe that below the pH where hydroquinone is nearly inactive alone, one might as well leave it out of an MQ or PQ developer. The same has been said of ascorbate developers.
    Gadget Gainer

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