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  1. #11
    georgegrosu's Avatar
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    PE
    SCN is not a "complex combination"
    .
    I do not know how I could make that mistake.
    By definition, complex combination consists of: ion complex and outer sphere.
    Complex ion is plotted by square brackets. So, complex combination is recognizable by a square brackets.
    I wrote the potassium thiocyanate chemical formula and not have any square brackets. How I pulled myself that KSCN is a complex combination???
    In other news, KSCN has kept a hygroscopic tendency, to draw water.
    While becoming a soup with some crystals. I want to say that this is after decades of storage. Same thing happened to me with sodium sulphide - that smell is.
    George

  2. #12
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    George;

    And a hydrate such as forms with many salts is written with a dot, not brackets.

    So, Na2CO3 is the anhydrous (water free) salt and Na2CO3.H2O is the monohydrate. A number designates the amount of water taken up and so we have Na2S2O3.5H2O or Sodium Hypo (Thiosulfate) pentahydrate.

    For those interested.

    PE

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I just am unhappy at the regular confusion between Thiocyanate and Cyanide and am answering that point.
    Please don't be unhappy about it. Most people are not chemists, and have only vague memories that cyanide is a very dangerous poison, so they're uncertain, confused, or cautious about anything with a name that resembles "cyanide" (not being chemists, they aren't very comfortable with chemical formulas and think about these substances in terms of English (or other natural language) names). Naturally, the same questions and misconceptions will come up repeatedly because they're coming up from different people. That's the nature of how information is relayed: Those who possess it pass it on to those who don't, and given how much knowledge our species has accumulated, it's inevitable that, for most pieces of information, those who don't possess it will vastly outnumber those who do. Thus you as an expert may be asked the same basic question again and again and again. Try to be happy about it: You're helping more people understand this one thing.

    Now, if the same person kept asking this question, you might suggest a neurological workup, but that's another matter....

  4. #14

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    Sodium thiosulfate is used as an antidote for possible cyanide poisoning because it converts the cyamide to thiocyanate. One has to be quick though.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #15

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    if potassium thiosufate swallowed can cause death?

    if potassium thiosufate swallowed can cause death? if not how can we make potassium thiocynate toxic to health?

  6. #16

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    "For those interested"

    Thank you!

  7. #17

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    Exposure to hydrogen sulfide for more than 30 minutes at concentrations of greater than 600 ppm have been fatal. Continuous inhalation of low concentrations may cause olfactory fatigue, so that the odor is no longer an effective warning of the presence of hydrogen sulfide. This toxicity is approimately 1/3 to 1/2 that of hydrogen cyanide. Therefore sulfur toners such as sodium polysulfide should only be used in a well ventilated room.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by sonal123 View Post
    if potassium thiosufate swallowed can cause death? if not how can we make potassium thiocynate toxic to health?
    I don't understand your comment as we are talking about potassium thiocyanate not thiosulfate.

    However, ingestion of large amounts of potassium salts can cause poisoning, the condition is called hyperkalemia. The potassium ions can cause an irregular heart beat and can case death. People with reduced kidney function are of particular risk and they are warned not to use salt substitutes. Potassium chloride is the third component used in execution by lethal injection. Certain medications such as some used to treat high blood pressure can cause the potassium level in the blood to reach a toxic level. As Pasteur pointed out is not the poison but the dosage that is important.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 03-29-2012 at 12:20 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alessandro Serrao View Post
    So it's chemically related to cyanide.
    Sodium chloride (NaCl) is "chemically related", as you say, to chlorine gas (Cl2). In fact, sodium chloride can be made directly by reacting metallic sodium with chlorine. But I'm sure you know there is a huge difference in the toxicity of the chorine in those two very different, but chemically related, compounds.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    Please don't be unhappy about it. Most people are not chemists, and have only vague memories that cyanide is a very dangerous poison, so they're uncertain, confused, or cautious about anything with a name that resembles "cyanide" (not being chemists, they aren't very comfortable with chemical formulas and think about these substances in terms of English (or other natural language) names). Naturally, the same questions and misconceptions will come up repeatedly because they're coming up from different people. That's the nature of how information is relayed: Those who possess it pass it on to those who don't, and given how much knowledge our species has accumulated, it's inevitable that, for most pieces of information, those who don't possess it will vastly outnumber those who do. Thus you as an expert may be asked the same basic question again and again and again. Try to be happy about it: You're helping more people understand this one thing.

    Now, if the same person kept asking this question, you might suggest a neurological workup, but that's another matter....
    Remember, Google is your friend.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

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