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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    I use Ilford Hypam with both film and paper. It is very convenient and economical because it is a strong fixer that lasts a long time. I don't think it's a hardening fixer but I don't care.
    Both Ilford Rapid Fixer and Hypam are non-hardening rapid fixers. Hypam is recommended as compatible with an added hardener. Rapid Fixer is not recommended for that.

    I use the latter because it comes in 1 liter bottles and Hypam's smallest is 5 liters. I'm not sure yet (just started the switchover) how long it takes me to use a liter, but I suspect I wouldn't use 5 liters in the 6 month recommended life for an opened bottle.

  2. #12
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Kodak Rapid Fixer seems like a great product. Concentrated, fast, hardening or non; what's not to like? (besides the cost of shipping a liquid)

    Side note: Kodak's website is worthless with regards to finding out any information regarding their products. I'm tempted to drive to Rochester.....
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  3. #13
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I've had very good luck with Ilford Hypam fixer. It's inexpensive too, but only comes in 5liter buckets, which makes shipping an interesting proposition. Perhaps you have some place around the corner you can buy it locally?

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #14
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    What would I add to Hypam as a hardener? I might be able to find some in Kansas City.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  5. #15

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    Ilford Rapid Fixer. It is non-hardening. The nice part is it will fully fix a sheet of fiber based printing paper in 1 minute, which can cut down on the archival washing sequence (if you follow the right sequence and use a hypo clearing agent like Ilford Washaid (also a liquid concentrate).

    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Howdy all,

    So for many reasons I'm going liquid. Mainly, shelf life. I don't currently go thru enough chemistry to justify the powder and anything that can make the setup time of my darkroom easier, cleaner and more efficient is a welcome thing.

    My main question is regarding fixers. I've only used classic Kodak Fixer and I'm not familiar with advantages/pitfalls of rapid or non-hardening fixers. Could someone wax poetic on this? I need something that's suitable for paper & film, and it should be noted that I do 4x5" in trays.

    Other than my fixer, here is what I have in mind. If you know of something better/cheaper let me know. And I'd rather give my business to Photographer's Formulary than say, the B&H's of the world.

    Film Dev: HC-110 (was using D76)
    Pap Dev: Liquidol (was using Dektol)
    Stop Ba: Kodak Indicator (same)
    Fixer: ??
    HCA: Edwal 4&1 Hypo Eliminator (was using Kodak HCA)

    Of PF's liquid film developers, is there a HC-110 clone?

    Thanks

  6. #16
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I used to buy Hypam in 5L jugs at my local store. They no longer stock it though so I will have to figure out something else.
    f/22 and be there.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    I think a hardening fixer is the way to go for what I do. Now, does a rapid fixer usually entail non-hardening? I see that Ilford's is non-hardening and that Kodak's is a 2-part with a hardener. So with a 2-part system, I can choose to make it hardening or not?
    I've never used a 2-part product (fixer with separate hardener), but that's my understanding. Kodak does have a rapid fixer with built-in hardener, but I don't recall its name offhand. I did buy a bottle once and it worked fine.

    And is there any disadvantage to a rapid fixer? If not, saving time seems like a no-brainer.
    In terms of the final result, AFAIK there's no disadvantage to a rapid fixer, and in fact I've seen suggestions that there are advantages. Specifically, I've seen claims that rapid fixers do a better job with T-grain films than do non-rapid (sodium thiosulfate) fixers. I've never seen any actual data to back this claim up, though, so take it with a grain of salt. There can also be wash-time implications, but these interact with the presence of hardeners and other factors, so it's best to take wash time on a fixer-by-fixer basis. Follow the manufacturer's recommendations, and test for retained silver and/or hypo to be sure you've got it right.

    Some rapid fixers have an ammonia odor. This is most common with certain alkaline products, such as the mix-it-yourself TF-3. (The commercial TF-4 also has an ammonia odor, but it's not as pronounced.) Many people dislike TF-3 for this reason, particularly for use in open trays. Acidic rapid fixers are unlikely to have a strong ammonia odor, so if you're sure you want one that's hardening, this shouldn't be an issue for you, since these fixers are necessarily acidic.

  8. #18
    lns
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    I use Ilford Rapid Fixer for film and paper. For paper, you can use it in a 1+4 or a 1+9 dilution, which allows you to choose either faster fixing or more economy.

    I don't want a hardener. First, I don't need it. Second, it's not made of the friendliest chemicals.

    -Laura

  9. #19

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    You can get Ilford Rapid Fixer in Kansas City (Overland Park), but I'm not sure about Hypam. You can also get Kodak Rapid Fixer there.

    Dave

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Kodak Rapid Fixer seems like a great product. Concentrated, fast, hardening or non; what's not to like? (besides the cost of shipping a liquid)

    Side note: Kodak's website is worthless with regards to finding out any information regarding their products. I'm tempted to drive to Rochester.....
    Does this help with Kodak chemistry:

    http://wwwcaen.kodak.com/global/en/p...?pq-path=14025?

    I'd like to try Liquidol, but buying liquid chemistry from Photographer's Formulary isn't as easy as buying directly from a store. I'm able to buy Kodak Polymax-T paper developer from Glazer's in Seattle, or sometimes locally, and I really like it.

    The problem with the Kodak Rapid Fixer is that in the quantities I'm interested in, you must buy it with the hardener, and the bottle of hardener results in Hazmat charges for shipping. Otherwise, I would still be using it (I'm Kodak loyal) rather than the Ilford Hypam or Ilford Rapid Fixer I'm currently using.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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