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  1. #21
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    <Posted via APUG mobile wap service..> (Logic-Joe)

    Quote Originally Posted by DLawson
    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    I use Ilford Hypam with both film and paper. It is very convenient and economical because it is a strong fixer that lasts a long time. I don't think it's a hardening fixer but I don't care.
    Both Ilford Rapid Fixer and Hypam are non-hardening rapid fixers. Hypam is recommended as compatible with an added hardener. Rapid Fixer is not recommended for that.

    I use the latter because it comes in 1 liter bottles and Hypam's smallest is 5 liters. I'm not sure yet (just started the switchover) how long it takes me to use a liter, but I suspect I wouldn't use 5 liters in the 6 month recommended life for an opened bottle.
    I use Hypam, but I decant it into one liter glass bottles. This gives me the choice to use added hardener, and extends the shelf life almost "forever" from all I can discover.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Does this help with Kodak chemistry:

    http://wwwcaen.kodak.com/global/en/p...?pq-path=14025?
    Sadly, no. This is the worthless website I'm referring to. I want PDF's! Some chems are better than others, but as far as process times, and in-depth information, it's not there.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  3. #23

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    i understand that hypo eliminator and fixer remover
    are different things, and that the eliminator is not
    suggested for modern/current films and papers
    because it does more harm than good.
    hardeners they say do more harm than good as well
    and it is more difficult to get a good clean wash seeing
    the hardener traps in the emulsion the things one may be trying to wash out ...

    sprint fixer and fixer remover are great...

    the sprint photochemistry is a "system" and if you use all their products
    dev, stop, fix, fix remover ... you know when the chemistry is bad/done
    when the stop bath turns/indicates. it is helpful seeing their speed fixer does not
    indicate with hypo check accurately .

    good luck !
    john

  4. #24

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    I use TF5 from PF's with a highly dilute stop bath for 4x5 and 5x7 in trays with good results.TF5 does not have the as much ammonia small as TF4,it clears Tmax 100 color stain the best of other fixers I'v used.

  5. #25
    greybeard's Avatar
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    And is there any disadvantage to a rapid fixer? If not, saving time seems like a no-brainer.

    I may have missed it, but I don't think that anyone mentioned the potential for bleaching by ammonium thiosulfate-based fixers, which probably includes all of the contemporary ones. The instructions for the Kodak 2-part rapid hardening fixer that I used in the 1970s explicitly warned against over-fixing of prints and films, because of this bleaching effect. (They were right, too...) Moving fixed prints to a plain-water holding try solves that problem, however.

    One disadvantage to hardening fixers for paper is that they make print spotting with dye quite a trial; this is the main reason that I went from Kodak fixer (the powder stuff) to the Michael-and-Paula-Smith recipe, and more recently, to TF-4

  6. #26
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    hmm, yes, no one mentioned bleaching; thank you. This would be exactly the kind of thing I'd like to know too....
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  7. #27
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    I don't think bleaching is much of a concern. I use Ilford Hypam or Rapid Fixer at 1+4 for both film and RC paper and I've fixed film for over an hour, and prints for a half hour or more, and never noticed any problem.
    f/22 and be there.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Kodak Rapid Fixer seems like a great product. Concentrated, fast, hardening or non; what's not to like?
    Was that directed to my post? I don't recall saying anything about Kodak's product being not-likable.

    Before starting the switch to Ilford Rapid Fixer I'd only ever used Kodak Professional Fixer (sodium thiosulfate). I had a lot of good reviews of Ilford Rapid Fixer, and if Kodak Professional Fixer is available in sizes less than one gallon, I couldn't find it.

    (Also Kodak discontinued both the B&W paper that I used and the film developer I used. Why look for another darkroom product on a shrinking shelf?)

  9. #29
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    No, it was a rhetorical "what's not to like", not directed at anyone...
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  10. #30
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    The use of Kodak Flexicolor (C-41) Fixer for black and white material is one of the gems I recently picked here on A.P.U.G. One gallon of the concentrate is under $10, and will make an ungodly amount of film or paper fixer. I believe PE recommends 1:9 for paper and 1:3 for film (though I use 1:4 - the standard C-41 dilution - just like with most liquid concentrate fixers).

    It is a non hardening fixer, like Ilford Rapid Fixer or Hypam out of the bottle (i.e. sans hardener). Ilford recommend against use of a hardener for modern films, as it is unnecessary and inhibits washing. Hardeners are often not recommend for photo paper because they inhibit both washing and spotting.

    The only thing I use a hardening fixer for is Efke/Adox emulsions. When I have a batch of these to develop, I get some Kodafix Solution. To my recollection, the powder Kodak Fixer can be mixed up with or without the hardener, and the liquid Kodafix Solution is a hardening fixer.

    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    I think a hardening fixer is the way to go for what I do.
    What do you do that makes you think this?
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 08-11-2010 at 01:06 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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