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  1. #1
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    Selecting the speed of your film?

    What goes into making the decision of which speed film you want to use.
    I know if it is a low light situation then a faster film would probably be the choice.
    What if you were going our during the day to shot buildings or street type shots what would go into your decision?
    I am not asking you to tell me what film to use...just how you go about deciding what film you will use.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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    Barry
    Monroe, GA

  2. #2
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    I think about a few main things (not necessarily in order of importance):

    - What sort of sharpness and grain I want for the picture
    - Whether or not I will be hand holding for the shots
    - What sort of light I will be shooting in
    - What sort of dynamic range I want the film to be able to capture (i.e. SBR)

    For much of what I shoot in 35mm, hand held in a variety of situations - often dark, or in and out of the shade, with moving subjects - a 100 film won't cut it in terms of stopping action, depth of field, or simply being able to get enough exposure at all. 400 and Delta 3200 - which is actually ISO 1000 - are my two main films. I use slower films sometimes, but rarely, in 35mm. Occasionally I will shoot a roll of Reala, or a consumer 100 or 200 film that someone has given me. I also shoot a roll of T64 when needed, and I use Acros for copying text and other flat things on a copy stand. For 35mm shooting, I rarely need or want the technical qualities of slower films. I'll usually just go to medium or large format if I want a really sharp and grainless picture.

    In medium format, I shoot more color. For hand held pix, I generally shoot NPH/400H or NPZ/800Z, Tri-X 320, T-Max 400, HP5, and sometimes I will shoot the NPH and the other faster films on a tripod. However, generally medium format on a tripod is when I will use 100 films, such as Reala, Acros, T-Max, FP4, Plus-X, or Acros for long exposures. I also use Tri-X 320, HP5, and Delta 3200, even on a tripod.

    With large format, I generally use a 100 film, and sometimes slower. I use 320 and 400 (b/w or color) films as well, for faster shutter speeds, less contrast, more D of F, etc. FP4 is my main b/w sheet film.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #3
    Ricus.stormfire's Avatar
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    Well for me it depends whether I'm going to be hand holding (TLR) or use a tripod (SLR). When I hand hold I tend to use films in the range of 200* to 400 ISO. Tripod shots usually 125 or 200 ISO, but I've muddied my own water by buying 25, 80 ISO and IR films recently, which will also go with this choice. Altough I've had some success with ratings as low as 80 with the TLR (but in good light though).

    I doubt if I'll use slower films in the slr handheld (but I use a tripod with these systems anyway 99% of the time, and the 1% tends to be 400 ISO - though I'm not too fond of hand holding a 6x6/6x7 slr)

    So to make a long story short depends on camera system and if I'm going to use a tripod or not

    (*FP4 + rated at 200)

    Ricus

    or what 2F/2F said he sounds smarter than me anyway
    Last edited by Ricus.stormfire; 08-28-2010 at 04:31 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: added something

  4. #4
    fotch's Avatar
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    I usually pick the slowest film that is suitable for the assignment. Since slower films for B&W or Color Negative, by Kodak or Ilford (B&W) , this is usually asa 100 film. Other factors have to be considered, amount of light, hand held, long lens, which may need the next fastest film.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  5. #5

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    You can often find alternative arguments to justify using a particular film in different situations. For example - fast film in low light as slow film means camera shake. But... use a tripod and maybe that reason disappears. But... low light can mean low contrast - and so maybe 25 ISO or 50 ISO film, with their inherent higher contrast, on a tripod, are more suitable? Conventional films are usually more responsive to push processing... but modern T-Max/delta type films have much better reciprocity characteristics - so maybe do not need pushing, just a long exposure.

    I mean, there are so many different ways of skinning a ferret - I bet two different photographers could both take a great picture in any particular situation, one using 35mm Tmax 3200 and one using 4 X 5 Across 100.

    Obviously they would get very different images, so I suppose it depends what type of picture you want - but for me that changes over time. I used to be obsessed with ultra fine grain, so used a lot of fine grain developers and films. At the moment I'm boiling forte pan 400 in rodinal and loving the grain.
    Steve

  6. #6
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    I like the tonality of TMax-400 in D76 1+1, and since I use either MF or LF on a tripod, grain and shutter speeds are no issue. In other words, I'm as boring as one film and one developer.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
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  7. #7

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    I'll mention depth of field since this I didn't notice it mentioned specifically. I had been using 400 for hand-held street shots, but recently tried 100, and the shallower depth of field gives things a different look and makes different demands on how I shoot and what I look for. Not better or worse, just different.

  8. #8
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    The biggest consideration for me is shutter speed.

    I tend toward aperture priority, by that I mean when I have a choice I want to be able to define a short DOF.

    F3.8 and be there with my RB. For daylight work the shutter speed limit at 1/400th means I choose slower films. With my N90s and 1/8000th of a second shutter speed available I choose faster film.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #9

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    Tmax 400 in Fomadon Excel (like xtol), in 35mm, 120mm, and 4x5. All formats and situations. Life is easy

  10. #10
    MattKing's Avatar
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    This is one of the reasons having interchangeable backs on your medium format cameras is really nice.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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