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  1. #21

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    A little while ago I used some Ilford wetting agent that I had for a few years and had some fairly random drying marks. I guessed it had 'gone off' and used a new bottle of Tetenal Mirasol and no more marks. Wetting agent tends to last so long in terms of usage that I overlooked how long I had had it and so put the marks down to that.

  2. #22
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    It's fine to leave the film on the reel, in fact it's safer.

    However in this case the OP needs to used de-ionised or distilled water for the final rinses, it's a glaring hard water issue.

    BTW Rick alcohol is great for drying film but if you bathe in 3-4 baths each with higher alcohol content the last 98%+ the film dries two minutes later Getting that grade alcohol is the issue though

    Ian

    Ian, I am using distilled water and photo flo for the final rinse. I think I just may have been using too much photo-flo and it ran down the film and accumulated on the final frame. Is there a household acetic acid I can pick up at a local store to soak it in? I can't tell which side of the film it's on, like I said it appears to be IN the film

  3. #23
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    The active ingredient in distilled (white) vinegar is acetic acid.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  4. #24
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Good advice, even on the emulsion side?
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    A bathe in dilute acetic acid can often dissolve the calcium salts causing the problems followed by a good wash and rinse with deionised/distilled water & photo-flo.

    Ian

  5. #25
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    The active ingredient in distilled (white) vinegar is acetic acid.
    Is it feasible to soak the film in white vinegar to attempt to remove the deposit?

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    Is it feasible to soak the film in white vinegar to attempt to remove the deposit?
    Vinegar is dirt cheap where I live, and I imagine it isn't expensive anywhere.

    So a couple of bucks for a bottle of vinegar is you don't happen to have it already in the kitchen, and cut it to 1+3 is where I would start. Not sure what concentration would be recommended to clean calcium stains. But 1+3 should be about 1-2% acetic acid for most grocery store brands.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  7. #27
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    Vinegar is dirt cheap where I live, and I imagine it isn't expensive anywhere.

    So a couple of bucks for a bottle of vinegar is you don't happen to have it already in the kitchen, and cut it to 1+3 is where I would start. Not sure what concentration would be recommended to clean calcium stains. But 1+3 should be about 1-2% acetic acid for most grocery store brands.
    Michael, excellent! I guess I was just a bit concerned about soaking a negative in vinegar! I will certainly give it a try, the negative is worthless to me in its current state. And the thing is, it's such a great image!

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    Michael, excellent! I guess I was just a bit concerned about soaking a negative in vinegar! I will certainly give it a try, the negative is worthless to me in its current state. And the thing is, it's such a great image!
    Just make sure you use distilled vinegar, not the cider vinegar.

    Frankly, when I was a kid I used vinegar as a stop bath. What's the difference in food grade acetic acid in a bottle of vinegar and photo grade acetic acid from a chemical supply house? None that the film knows about.

    The local druggist gave me the 1+3 proportion when I was trying to buy photo chemicals. In the tiny town I grew up in the drug store was where you bought any kind of chemicals except farm chemicals.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  9. #29
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    Stop bath is dilute acetic acid. I would probably mix some fresh for this operation, as opposed to risking some contaminant from a used batch. (And I suspect distilled white vinegar these days is pretty pure -- more industrial than food stuff.)

  10. #30
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    Stop bath is dilute acetic acid. I would probably mix some fresh for this operation, as opposed to risking some contaminant from a used batch. (And I suspect distilled white vinegar these days is pretty pure -- more industrial than food stuff.)
    Would the stop bath need to be diluted more than normal?



 

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