Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,560   Posts: 1,545,261   Online: 809
      
Page 4 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 89
  1. #31
    DWThomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,240
    Images
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    Would the stop bath need to be diluted more than normal?
    I don't really know, but if it were me I'd probably try half the normal strength and see what it does. If the marks are calcium deposits, the strength would probably reflect in the time needed to get results rather than any particular threshold effect. My main point is that it is something we usually slosh film through anyway. And of course, I'd vote for a decent wash afterward.

  2. #32
    michaelbsc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,106
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    ... if it were me I'd probably try half the normal strength and see what it does. ... I'd vote for a decent wash afterward.
    I wouldn't even bother to cut it in half if you use Stop Bath. What's the difference? You're not going to damage the negative any more than normal processing, and the extra acetic acid is either going to work better or do nothing.

    If you cut the concentration of anything I'd look at cutting the PhotoFlo.

    I use the Ilford product instead of Kodak's (got a good deal on a bottle and it seems to last a lifetime) and I find that even half the bottle's recommendation still makes more suds than I like. I use it at about 25% the recommended dose.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  3. #33
    michaelbsc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,106
    Images
    5
    And if you happen to use one of the low odor stop baths it isn't acetic acid. It's citric acid, and that's unlikely to help as much with the calcium stains. It will help, but not as well as acetic.

    Both vinegar and citric acid cleaners are used to clean coffee pots, and there the offending material is the same suspected calcium salts. But don't use a coffee pot cleaner. It may very well eat holes in the film base.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Winnipeg, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,301
    Nope, a 2-2.5% solution is very good at dissolving mineral deposits. Use in your coffee maker, crusty flower vases(not lead crystal ones), etc, if you make it with non indicating acetic acid.

  5. #35
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,846
    Blog Entries
    1
    Photo-flo on the reels will become a catalyst and somewhere along the line will begin to cause the problems you are having.
    Never put reels in Photo Flo.
    The only thing to do now is scrub the reels in very hat water with a stiff brush.
    Throw away the PF and get some LFN - the problem is solved.
    When you have hundreds of students going through the darkroom ieach year for 20 years it doesn't take long to know what works and what doesn't.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  6. #36
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,273
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    Good advice, even on the emulsion side?
    Well it doesn't affect the emulsion which is why Acetic acid is used as stop bath.

    Dilute Hydrochloric acid will work as well, a 2% solution, again with no ill effects.

    Ian

  7. #37
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,273
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Noel View Post
    Photo-flo on the reels will become a catalyst and somewhere along the line will begin to cause the problems you are having.
    Never put reels in Photo Flo.
    The only thing to do now is scrub the reels in very hat water with a stiff brush.
    Throw away the PF and get some LFN - the problem is solved.
    When you have hundreds of students going through the darkroom ieach year for 20 years it doesn't take long to know what works and what doesn't.
    I disagree completely with you and Bob about not putting reels in Phtoflo, not all products are the same though.

    However I strongly advise good washing of reels with hot water, there's also a slow build up of gelatin, I soak my Paterson reels in biological washing powder once every 6 months or so.

    The problem with long chain detergents is they don't wash off properly with cold water.

    So either do as Bob advises or wash the reels well in warm/hot water after being in Photoflo, both ways prevents any detergent build up.

    Ian

  8. #38
    Ian David's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,079
    Images
    16
    Brian
    They look very much like drying marks to me. If they are on the emulsion side, I don't think you will get them out with acetic acid or anything else, as they are essentially in the emulsion, as you observed. I have a number of very similar neg strips from my old battles with this issue.
    In my experience, the most important thing with Photoflo is that it must be very thoroughly mixed in with your water before you put any film in the solution. You know how dishwashing liquid behaves when you put it in the hot water? Until it is thoroughly mixed in, little 'strands' of detergent can be seen swirling around. The consistency of Photoflo is much the same.
    Ian

  9. #39
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,273
    Images
    148
    Ian, Acetic acid can often remove quite bad calcium deposits on the emulsion side. The negative need to be soaked in water first to let the gelatin swell.

    Ian

  10. #40
    Ian David's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,079
    Images
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Ian, Acetic acid can often remove quite bad calcium deposits on the emulsion side. The negative need to be soaked in water first to let the gelatin swell.

    Ian
    Thanks Ian - that is good to know for future reference. But I guess it won't help Brian if these are not calcium deposits. He said he is using distilled water, so I assumed that this is probably not a water quality issue.
    Ian



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin