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  1. #81
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    Do you have a way to test the conductivity of the Walmart water?
    No I don't. What happened was I was getting streak-free results using the photo-flo/alcohol combo on a few rolls then suddenly the streaks showed back up. I thought about anything I had done differently. The only thing was the water. I had been using target distiller water and went to walmart water. I'm not 100% sure that was it, but it was the only variable I changed! Maybe some distiller water is more distiller than others??

  2. #82
    Vilk's Avatar
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    interesting, my fix was cutting down on wash times. the marks were really bad when i washed generously. now it's three vigorous "ilford cycles" in tap, then one in distilled, then a drop of LFN per litre of distilled for one last quick dip, an aggressive dog shake and hanging. i may get a mark once in a hundred frames, but for all practical purposes they're gone

  3. #83
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    You might write me off as foolish, but to avoid drying marks on 120 film I use a very soft and supple rubber edge and simply wipe off the excess.

    I use Sprint End Run wetting agent, and the instructions clearly state to remove the excess wetting agent.

    Never a spot on my negatives. No fancy distilled water or anything like that needed, just plain old tap water.

    This doesn't work well on the emulsion side with Foma or Efke films, because they are extremely soft. Works really well with all other films (Kodak, Ilford, and Fuji).

    You absolutely must keep that rubber edge clean, so what I do is wet my fingers with wetting agent mix, and run them along the rubber edge before I gently apply it to the film.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #84
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Thomas, what kind of rubber edge? A small windshield wiper?

  5. #85
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    Thomas, what kind of rubber edge? A small windshield wiper?
    Yes. A used windshield wiper works best because it has a smoother edge than a new one. But I imagine a silicone rubber edge of any type could be repropriated.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #86

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    Another great material for the final wipe is called "Webril Pads", a graphic arts material that comes on a very long roll about 8" wide. It is thick and soft, and free of any harmful stuff (may be cotton, I'm not sure) and is perforated into sheets like toilet paper. One sheet, soaked in the final rinse (mine is distilled water and a tiny bit of photo flo), then dried as much as you can, can be swabbed down on each side of the film after hanging to dry. Never a mark, scratch, or any other problem. And you can use one sheet for several rolls of film, a roll will last years. (I don't use them on sheet film.)

    Sorry, I just realized I said this a few years ago at the beginning of this thread, oh well.

  7. #87
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    FINAL UPDATE: You guys were right, I needed to get the excess water off of the Tri-x, more than just squeegeeing with fingers. What I tried was something I had in my darkroom: PEC pads, you can see them here. I take 2 pads for 120 film and put one on each side of the film and then squeegee using my fingers as I had before, except now the pads are wiping the film smoothly and cleanly. My Tri-x negs are drying perfectly clean, and consistently. For the final rinse I'm using Photo-flo at recommended dilution. Let's hope this is the last update!!

  8. #88
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    FINAL FINAL UPDATE: I re-read this thread recently and a few other threads on this subject and saw quite a few recommendations here and on RFF for using a distilled water final wash and simply hanging the film to dry. No PHOTO FLO at all. Well I tried this and wouldn't you believe it. Perfect negs. Turns out I don't even need photo-flo. I thought I had this problem fixed in the previous post but have still been having the occasional white streak at the bottom of the film (the last frame).

    So for anyone reading this thread. This is my recommendation if you've tried more photo-flo, less photo-flo and still get marks. Get rid of the photo-flo!! After you're running water wash dump the tank, fill with distilled water and agitate 20 times. Let tank sit for a minute. Dump, fill and agitate again. Then I hold the negs up in front of me at a 45 degree angle and let the water drain off, then hang to dry. No squeegee or finger squeegee or anything.

    Sometimes we make things too difficult for ourselves.

  9. #89
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Brian, you are correct in getting rid of photo-flo, horrible stuff. I use distilled water with one drop LFN and a capful of 90% iso. for final rinse, then shake excess liguid from film while still in the reel. Never any spots or streaks and my film dries quickly.
    Rick Allen
    Argentum aevum

  10. #90

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    I was taught in a Photography 101 college class to never, ever touch our film with anything while it's wet and almost nothing after it's dry. That was many years ago, but it's the one thing I do remember that our instructor drove into each of us. He also said that he'd know the minute he saw our negatives so I doubt any of us deviated from his advice. Later on I did try a special film squeegee that I still have, but never use. I still have a bottle of Photoflo, but only use it for pre-soaking film for some pyro development and not for final rinse. I use distilled water for a quick final rinse, then fill the tank back up with fresh distilled water and add two drops(for 120 film) Edwal's LFN and a tablespoon of 90% isol.alc., invert the tank several times and then let set for 4 or 5 minutes. This is pretty much what Rick A above does, but I use a little further twist. After the 4 or 5 minute set time I pull the film and hang it horizontally, with one end lower than the other, so the water runs downhill and drips off the lower corner. The final trick is after about 5 minutes or so I take a folded paper towel and just gently touch the built up water on the lower edge of the film to wick-away the bit of water that might not have enough gravitational pull to make it to that bottom corner. This works great for me and I'm not changing anything unless I start having problems. One thing I do agree on is that using even a slightly more than recommended amount of Photoflo is a killer so I don't mess with it anymore for final rinse. Just my thoughts. John W

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