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  1. #21
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    Like Shawn (hi Shawn, it was good to meet you last weekend) I am relatively new to pyro type developers. But even before using it I associated the word "pyro" with pyrogallol developers such as PMK. It seems to me that "pyrocat" (small p) would be a good word to associate with pyrocatechol type developers, like Pyrocat or Dixactol.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

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  2. #22
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    I would check out the book "The Darkroom Cookbook" by Steve Anchell (and by "check out," I also mean that it may be available at a library near you). There are five useful paragraphs on stand development that will do more for you than piecing together tidbits from the Internet as your first introduction to the technique. One paragraph is introductory, one is on advantages, one is on disadvantages, and two that explain the basics of how to employ the technique.
    2F/2F

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  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3 View Post
    I think the recent association of 'pyro' with catechol in its many guises is purely the result of Sandy King's choice of name for the groundbreaking developer he invented.

    Gerald: I will henceforth excise the word 'pyrocatechin' from my vocabulary. I place that misnomer in the same class as calling a substance as alkaline as pyrogallol 'pyrogallic acid', which some vendors still do.
    Pyrocatechin is rarely used these days for catechol, but pyrocatechol is a perfectly good modern equivalent, and in some respects has more use in the scientific literature.

    When I developed the Pyrocat formula I used the name Pyro in it because whether you call the chemical pyrocatechin, pyrocatechol, or just catechol it does the same thing in development as pyrogallol, i.e. it stains and tans when used in solutions low in sulfite.

    I would also note that in The Film Developing Cookbook, Anchell and Troop treat both pyrogallol and pyrocatechin in the same chapter, Tanning Developers.

    That said, I find it perfectly reasonable to use the term "pyro developer" to refer to either pyrogallol or pyrocatechol.

    Sandy

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    I would check out the book "The Darkroom Cookbook" by Steve Anchell (and by "check out," I also mean that it may be available at a library near you). There are five useful paragraphs on stand development that will do more for you than piecing together tidbits from the Internet as your first introduction to the technique. One paragraph is introductory, one is on advantages, one is on disadvantages, and two that explain the basics of how to employ the technique.
    Could you possibly provide a page reference (or section)? I'm interested in trying stand development but can't seem to find this passage in the book. Thanks!

  5. #25
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chaptastic View Post
    Could you possibly provide a page reference (or section)? I'm interested in trying stand development but can't seem to find this passage in the book. Thanks!
    Stand development is covered in the 3rd edition, pages 39-40.

    The 2nd edition only has one paragraph for agitation, mentioning 10 seconds/minute and continuous shuffling for sheet film in trays.

    If you don't have the 3rd edition, you won't find stand development mentioned.

    Lee

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L View Post
    Stand development is covered in the 3rd edition, pages 39-40.

    The 2nd edition only has one paragraph for agitation, mentioning 10 seconds/minute and continuous shuffling for sheet film in trays.

    If you don't have the 3rd edition, you won't find stand development mentioned.

    Lee
    That explains it. The copy I have (from the library) is 2nd ed. The book looks like it's got some pretty valuable information so I may have to procure a copy of the 3rd ed.

    Thanks again.

  7. #27

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    I use TD3 for my stand development. Any film from 400 to 25. 1.5 hours. Love the results. 45 second agitation, then leave it alone. Water stop, TF4 fix.

  8. #28

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    Indeed. Shake it up, tap the bubbles out and then leave it alone. All this science is great, up to a point. I think it is called "stand development" for a reason.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Uneven development is very common when doing standing development.
    This was my biggest problem. It was subtle too so I developed many rolls before I realized what was going on. I have given up on stand development for roll film.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by vedmak View Post
    if the question is clear tonal separation in extreme lighting conditions, pyro developers will blow the socks off the stand development. In one of his books saint Ansel had a picture of a light bulb developed in pyro developer, try to do that one on a working light bulb with Xtol
    Be careful when using the word "pyro". There are two basic "pyro" developers. One is pyrogallol or pyrogallic acid which is the more toxic and active of the two. the other is pyrocatechol or pyrocatechin which is somewhat less toxic.

    The Adams image you mention was developed in a very highly diluted pyrocatechin developer which is a highly compensating developer.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

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