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  1. #1
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    Stand development???

    I see many post where they have used the "Stand development" method and I was wondering about pros and cons of the method.
    One pro that seems obvious is you can walk away for awhile.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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  2. #2
    MrclSchprs's Avatar
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    One contra... not every film or developer is suited for stand development

  3. #3
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Uneven development is very common when doing standing development.

    But some possibilities are undeniable. When you use highly dilute developers (Rodinal is especially good for this, according to my own experience), for a long time without agitating, areas of the negative that received a lot of exposure will have the developer that's adjacent to the film plane exhausted pretty quickly.
    And areas of the film that did not receive a lot of exposure will have the developer last for a pretty long time, improving shadow detail (and subsequently film speed).
    I have seen prints from Tri-X negatives exposed at EI 25,000 processed this way, and the results were acceptable. Not great. But acceptable.
    Developing this way will 'even out' differences in exposure and density from frame to frame on a roll of film. Overexposed frames can live pretty happily next to underexposed ones.

    You can also gain some edge effects where areas of high density are directly adjacent to areas of low density. Sharp shifts in tonality, along an edge, will get this 'super sharp' appearance. Some like it, others don't.

    It's something that isn't for everybody, but that can yield some pretty impressive results with enough practice. See Steve Sherman, for example.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #4
    vedmak's Avatar
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    try pmk

    if the question is clear tonal separation in extreme lighting conditions, pyro developers will blow the socks off the stand development. In one of his books saint Ansel had a picture of a light bulb developed in pyro developer, try to do that one on a working light bulb with Xtol

  5. #5
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vedmak View Post
    In one of his books saint Ansel had a picture of a light bulb developed in pyro developer, try to do that one on a working light bulb with Xtol
    (I think I will. Sounds like a challenge.)
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #6
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
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    This might be a good thread to read....
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/2...eveloping.html
    ____________________________________________
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  7. #7
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    Some people cite uneven development and/or "bromide drag" with stand development.

    I have never tried stand development, defined as the only agitation being at the beginning of development. But I have been using semi-stand development, which I define as 1-1/2 minutes of initial agitation followed by 10 seconds of agitation at the half point in the total developing time. I have been using this routine with Pyrocat HD for about 6 months and I am getting nice, snappy, printable negatives with no ill effects.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  8. #8
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vedmak View Post
    if the question is clear tonal separation in extreme lighting conditions, pyro developers will blow the socks off the stand development. In one of his books saint Ansel had a picture of a light bulb developed in pyro developer, try to do that one on a working light bulb with Xtol
    You mean something like this ...

    Tri-X 400 in D76 1:1 at 6.30 minutes pull development, deliberately overexposed for detail in shadows ("Expose for the shadows"), I measured an about 11-13 stop / EV range.

    You don't have to be a saint , nor risk uneven development as in stand, to do this (if you can afford to have slightly longer exposure times):





    For an even better impression of the amount of shadow detail, see the images against a dark backdrop on my personal website here (the light APUG background makes images look darker):

    http://www.boeringa.demon.nl/haarlem...1_0266_17.html
    http://www.boeringa.demon.nl/haarlem...N1_0267_7.html

    And a side/sight of Adam's I didn't know , from here:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Ansel Adams TIME Cover & "The Cover That Missed", 1979
    cover & c print, signed, unique (printed in 1984 in an edition of 25)
    "The only photographer to appear on the cover of TIME, photo by me, signed by Ansel Adams, September 3, 1979. The Cover That Missed inscribed with, 'For David Hume Kennerly, The cover that Missed! Ansel Adams, NY-9-5-79' . The photograph underscores Ansel's playfulness and fine sense of humor. He had a pair of glasses with no lenses, and demonstrated them in a vivid visual fashion."
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

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  9. #9
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vedmak View Post
    if the question is clear tonal separation in extreme lighting conditions, pyro developers will blow the socks off the stand development. In one of his books saint Ansel had a picture of a light bulb developed in pyro developer, try to do that one on a working light bulb with Xtol
    You know you can stand develop with some pyro developers, right? =)

  10. #10
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Standing development is also about boosting micro contrast, and general contrast, when you're photographing low contrast scenes.
    I was shooting pinhole using Kodak Plus-X film a year or so ago, and used 120 film to make 6x6 negatives. I would process them in 1+200 dilution Rodinal at 70 degrees F for 60 minutes with 10s agitation at the 30 minute mark, and a full minute of agitation at the start.

    I got negatives that printed well on Grade 3 paper from scenes that were foggy and low contrast, as well as scenes that were fairly brightly lit in the middle of the day with normal contrast.
    Attached prints are almost straight prints at Grade 3 (left one is Forte Polygrade and right one Fomabrom Variant).

    It is a great tool for anybody to use.

    - Thomas
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails by_the_water_-_002_sm.jpg   by_the_water_-_001_sm.jpg  
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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