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  1. #11
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    I love tri-x for skin tone.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuzanneR View Post
    I love tri-x for skin tone.
    And I love what you do with Tri-X.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #13
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    yes,
    I just recently did some tri x in PMK and was especially pleased with the skin tones even on the RC test prints I made.

  4. #14
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    The standards all mentioned above are all great for most skin tones.

    Here are some other, off-the-beaten-track options to consider: have a look at the dr5 processed films. Also consider the near-infrared films like superpan, rollei IR, sfx etc. with a red filter. If the skin is problematic, you can get some rather porcelain skin tones that way. On the other hand, if you want a leathery, vintage look, try a 403 UV filter over most of the standard films.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  5. #15

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    Plus-X is my personal favorite.

    Jim B.

  6. #16
    Nicole's Avatar
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    I have photographed portraits for clients with Tri-X 400 roll film for many years now and develop in Xtol. Wonderful stuff. I recommend you play with exposure, dev times and lighting, as each is unique with so many variables. Testing is the fun part and Tri-X is a great medium with lots of scope. Good luck.

  7. #17

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    Whether or not a film produces good skin tones depends on the spectral sensitivity of the film. For women you want to use a pan-chromatic fim. For men an ortho-chromatic film will bring out character in the face. Look at the spectral curves to determine a film.

    This subject is quite complicated and not just a matter of "which film ..." Also important are the choice of filtration and subject lighting. Many good books have been written concerning portraiture and I would suggest them for more information.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  8. #18

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    keithwms
    Here are some other, off-the-beaten-track options to consider: have a look at the dr5 processed films.
    That is certainly an interesting process.
    Nicole
    I have photographed portraits for clients with Tri-X 400 roll film for many years now and develop in Xtol. Wonderful stuff. I recommend you play with exposure, dev times and lighting, as each is unique with so many variables. Testing is the fun part and Tri-X is a great medium with lots of scope. Good luck.
    Plenty of Tri-X suggestions here and thanks. I have used Tri-X in the past but when I recently started up again I chose to go with HP5+ instead due to Kodak flipping around with their film lineup of late and ilford appear very committed. As for testing, HP5+ is getting me the results I need and similar to Tri-X. I have some rolls to shoot with portraits in mind to fine tune the process and yes testing can be fun. Then test again with T-max 400, I hope it doesn't go away or change.
    Gerald C Koch
    Also important are the choice of filtration and subject lighting. Many good books have been written concerning portraiture and I would suggest them for more information.
    Thanks Gerald!

  9. #19

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    One of the special qualities of Kodak Tech Pan was (is, if you find some, it seems to last forever, another quality) its rendition of skin tone and reduction of blemishes in portraiture. Ilford's SFX works well for skin tones also...
    The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.

  10. #20
    A49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Whether or not a film produces good skin tones depends on the spectral sensitivity of the film. For women you want to use a pan-chromatic fim. For men an ortho-chromatic film will bring out character in the face. Look at the spectral curves to determine a film.
    I agree with this. If you want to have special deep skin tones, use an ortho film (Ilford Ortho plus seems to be the best for this because of the relative high speed - 80 ISO.) Or use a more or less decent blue filter with normal film. Ortho films are relativly blind to red colours therefore they render skin teints which have an considerable red part in it darker than as expected when seen with the human eye. Blue filters also block red and make the mentioned teints darker.

    Best,
    Andreas
    Last edited by A49; 09-29-2010 at 04:40 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

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