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  1. #31

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    For male portraiture you sometimes want to show character which entails showing skin detail thus the use of the green filter. In this case the yellow filter will not work although it might be good for female portraits. As I said check literature on taking portraits for the exact filtration.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #32
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Yep, very broadly speaking, filtering blue (or UV) will make caucasian skin look more, uh, mature. At the other end of the spectrum, red/IR filtering can give truly porcelain skintone.

    Just for amusement I will (re)show a truly rancid photograph done with a UV (403) filter. Just to show how extreme an effect filtering can have. And here's the same fellow with IR filtering. We photographers wield great powers eh? Instantly make somebody younger or older, with a simple filter...
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  3. #33
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Yep, very broadly speaking, filtering blue (or UV) will make caucasian skin look more, uh, mature. At the other end of the spectrum, red/IR filtering can give truly porcelain skintone.

    Just for amusement I will (re)show a truly rancid photograph done with a UV (403) filter. Just to show how extreme an effect filtering can have. And here's the same fellow with IR filtering. We photographers wield great powers eh? Instantly make somebody younger or older, with a simple filter...
    Look like we should use deep red filters for portraits!

    MB
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  4. #34

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    I concur....T-Max 400 is the most outstanding film I have used and with the 2-stop gain from the 100 films you cant go wrong....attached some portraits I did of our local tourist treasure...the Gibraltar Rock Apes (forgive me for I have posted these before but in order to help im posting here)....important to note i was shooting against the sun and purposely metering for a very flat, low contrast look I am using as a 'theme' for the set....should have used fill flash for balancing light and all that but was done on purpose and I believe this shows the quality of this film....used with Xtol developer by the way.


    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    In your humble opinion, of course?

    TMax 400 is my favorite portrait film, because it's the one I know the best.
    It's about as far from 'muddy' as I can get with a film, and I think you are misrepresenting Kodak TMax films with your statement. It's sharper than either FP4 or HP5, has finer grain, and better resolution.
    To me, none of that really matters. I just love how the film looks. Five pictures attached. Four of them are TMax 400. Four 120 and one 35mm. Not easy to tell which is which; the prints are even more difficult. Treated differently for different lighting situations and desired results.

    I always advocate to learn one or two films and learn to use them well. Explore all possibilities with it, and once you get to that stage, you will be much better equipped than switching films for certain effects, be it skin tones or anything else.

    I don't know much about filters. I never use them.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Ape_hassy14.jpg   Ape_hassy29.jpg   Ape_hassy28.jpg   Ape_hassy6.jpg   Ape_hassy9.jpg  


  5. #35
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    That's certainly true, Gerald. I wasn't thinking broadly enough, I think.
    Filters are still baby thoughts in my mushy brain since I haven't used them much.
    I guess it depends on how we want to show our subject matter.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    For male portraiture you sometimes want to show character which entails showing skin detail thus the use of the green filter. In this case the yellow filter will not work although it might be good for female portraits. As I said check literature on taking portraits for the exact filtration.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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