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  1. #21
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Ah but it doesn't matter if *I* am upside-down, only the tank! You'll just have to imagine us antipodeans hanging off the south side of the globe like fruitbats, carefully holding our development tanks up the right way with respect to Greenwich before beginning the agitation...

  2. #22

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    Either x ray fog or incomplete fix. That is the overall effect.

    The black around the sprocket holes is a light leak so there are two problems.

  3. #23
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    Ronald,

    I think the "black" around the sprocket holes might be the film base, which may seem black and lightleaked in relation to the incomplete fixing.

    As an aside, I see the OP saying that he uses more developer than suggested (650 vs 600 ml) - this can also be a cause for problems, giving insufficient room for the liquid to move around which in turn may cause agitation issues.
    Last edited by Jerevan; 09-30-2010 at 03:18 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  4. #24
    clayne's Avatar
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    Aged fix at the bottom of the bottle is basically sulfuric crap. Refix it.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #25
    hrst's Avatar
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    Always do a clearing time test with the particular film and particular fixer in question. It's so easy with 35mm film and you can do it simultaneously when fixing, that there's no reason to skip it:

    1) Pour out a bit of the same fixer -- I use the cap from the fixer bottle to pour it in
    2) Cut a piece of film you are developing. With 35mm this is easy, you have the leader piece left you cut away first before putting films to reels.
    3) Submerge it partially in the fixer. Agitate at the same times you agitate the tank.
    4) Look at it every now and then, you can try to look at some text etc through it to see if it's cleared.
    5) When it is cleared, nicely and fully transparent, look at the clock. Clearing time is usually around 1-3 minutes. Double or triple this time, and it will be the total fixing time for the film.
    6) When the clearing time has doubled since the very first fixing with that fixer, it is time to make a new fixer.

    When you do this test, you'll see straight away if there is any problems in clearing or if it takes too much time. If that happens, make a new fresh fixer and try again.

  6. #26
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Or, you can use a pair of tweezers or tongs and hold one corner of the piece of film in the fixer for 30 seconds. Then dunk the whole piece in. Stop the clock when you can't tell the difference between the corner you dunked and the rest of the film. That is your clearing time. Double your clearing time and you have your magic number.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

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