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  1. #1

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    Processing Agfa Scala

    I've heard really some really good things about Scala B&W slide film previously. But when I tried looking in to it before now, found that Scala is no longer processed in NZ; it has to be sent to Australia! Whilst a few people are doing this, I would be more interested to know if it can be processed at home. Les' has recently posted an exquisite example using Scala in the Tech Gallery that reminded me about it.

  2. #2

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    Yes, Scala can be developed at home. Scala is an orthochromatic, black and white negative film that can be home developed in conventional B&W reversal chemistry.

    See: http://www.binbooks.com/books/photo/bidx/l/509E6AE264
    Tom Hoskinson
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson
    Yes, Scala can be developed at home. Scala is an orthochromatic, black and white negative film that can be home developed in conventional B&W reversal chemistry.

    See: http://www.binbooks.com/books/photo/bidx/l/509E6AE264

    Tom,

    i hate to disagree but a good friend uses a lot of scala (his sole b&w film for some time after tinkering with alternatives) and it is defnitely panchromatic. Have a look at the datasheet. Spectral sensitivity curves for APX 100 and scala look as if they used the same chart twice.
    It also looks very close to a contrasty APX with respect to grain and sharpness btw.

    Maco 100 POc is an orthopanchromatic film (probably made by Efke) which has little senistivity at the red end of the spectrum and can be developed in the same process. Grain is larger and contrast reduced resulting in less "snap" compared to Scala, though. One may be able to adjust the contrast accordingly when developing it at home.

    best

    Stefan

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    I'll take a look at the spectral sensitivity curves - dR5 claims Scala is orthochromatic. In any case, it can definitely be processed in a home lab.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Thanks very much Tom and Stefan, appreciate your expertise. The binbooks article looks quite straight forward to follow.

    Interestingly (to me) it actually looks like a similar process to reversing FP4+. Thanks again, John.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson
    Yes, Scala can be developed at home. Scala is an orthochromatic, black and white negative film that can be home developed in conventional B&W reversal chemistry.
    See: http://www.binbooks.com/books/photo/bidx/l/509E6AE264
    Tom,
    The site above is a worthwhile addition to any photographer's bookmarks. There is a WEALTH of information here.

    Thanks.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  7. #7
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    Scala can also be processed as a negative film. Try 8 minutes at 20C in Rodinal Special (Studional) at 1+32.

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    That's interesting Kevin. I also wonder how FP4+ processed as a positive compares with Scala. Just might have to give it a try.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Caulfield
    Scala can also be processed as a negative film. Try 8 minutes at 20C in Rodinal Special (Studional) at 1+32.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by John McCallum
    That's interesting Kevin. I also wonder how FP4+ processed as a positive compares with Scala. Just might have to give it a try.
    As I understand it, there are two major perrequistes for reversal processing b&w films with good results: It must be able to build up enough density and it must have a clear base. Rumours have it that Scala is a thicker layer of the APX-Emulsion on a clear base. This would explain differences as well as similarities. But take this with a truckload of salt.

    best

    Stefan

  10. #10
    rjr
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    Stefan,

    that friend of both of us and I spent the last weekend developing Agfa Scala and APX100 in the Foma slide kit and we came to the conlusion that both share the same film base (smells the same, feels the same, both are clear) and have a similar emulsion - but not the entirely same. When you cut of a piece of the 120 film and compare it in light you´ll notice slightly different shades of grey in the undeveloped emulsion.

    Scala at EI125 and APX100 at EI125 need 12min of first developement in the Kit (easy process and quite affordable!) and the Scala slides just looked perfect - deep shadows, structure in the highlights, sharp. The APX had a lesser density, lacked a bit of "deepness" - depending on the motive it might be enough... think of a black and oiled engine in a dark room (like Voelklingen!).

    Roman

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