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Thread: C-41 Processing

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    C-41 Processing

    Hey now all. I'm just getting back into photography after a few years off, I'm glad to see there's a big community here dedicated to film.

    So I've got a couple of old rolls of BW400CN lying around and I'd like to learn how to process C-41 film, just for the experience and the knowledge - I'm experienced with standard B&W developing, but I've never done C-41. I've googled around a bit and I haven't been able to find anything definitive on chemicals and the process.

    So I turn to you: what chemicals do I need? What is the process/how does it differ from standard B&W?

    Any help is much appreciated. Cheers.

  2. #2
    mts
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    Look in the color chemistry thread. You can find my posts on alternative C-41 and E-6 and plenty of information on commercial 3-rd party and Kodak chemistry. The most readily available third party chemistry (for US residents) is probably through Freestyle sales. Processing C-41 is nearly as easy as processing B&W with the added need to closely control developer temperature at 100F, for 3-1/2 minutes. Printing the negatives is another matter entirely. In my opinion the skill level to print color matches that of a good B&W printer although the details are quite different.
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

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    Order the C41 Press kit from B&H. You mix them from powder to form your chemicals. That's the best way to get started. With B+W chromogenic films you do not have to process at full temperature, nor as accurately (the temperature effects properties of the relations between colors, not applicable if dealing with B+W film.) There are instructions inside/times for processing down to 74 degrees IIRC.

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum221/...g-dummies.html

    Hope that helps. Feel free to PM me with any questions.
    --Nicholas Andre

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    Beware that in the powder/solid kit that the so called "blix" may lead to desaturated colors and coarser grain. Please look at other posts than mine in this regard.

    PE



 

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