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  1. #21
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    A wedding... wow

    I did this once with 2 rolls of a non reshootable Holocaust Survivor project I was a part of.
    I must have mixed up the D76 and the pre soak graduates.

    Needless to say i was seriously bummed but luckily I had other rolls and some digi and was the second shooter/lighting tech so all was not lost.

  2. #22
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    The frightening thing about shooting weddings to me was always the law of averages say that if you shoot enough it's only a matter of time before at least one is a disaster, although I've done many and never had a mishap I decided to "Quit while I was ahead" about fifteen years ago, and have managed to avoid them since.
    Ben

  3. #23

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    Made my first processing error in years last week. I'd mixed 5-litres of fresh ID-11 stock the previous day and put two rolls Neopan through. After 18 minutes at 1:3 the fix went in for 10 minutes. I was about to return the fix to its bottle when I realised I'd used an identical glass bottle for dev, fortunately labelled. The films had been developed for at least 28 minutes plus however long it took me to work out my mistake.

    I fixed them and expected to see negatives that would need a lazer to print but in fact they weren't significantly overdeveloped. As luck would have it the images were of medieval church interiors shot in the summer with barely sufficient light at 400 ASA. The processing error had corrected the underexposure with some slightly grainy, but beautifully tonal naturally lit church interiors. It helped that the developer was in a dilute mixture of course.

  4. #24
    wclark5179's Avatar
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    Sorry about your loss.

    What will the temp. of the B&G be?

    If you have shots on another format that cover the acts, then maybe you'll be OK.
    Bill Clark

  5. #25
    clayne's Avatar
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    Don't prepare all the chemicals before hand. Prepare the *next* chemical as you're doing the current step.

    That means mix the dilution of developer into a glass graduate first, pour into tank, initially agitate, etc.
    As time approaches the end, fill the graduate with stop-bath.
    Pour out the developer, pour in the stop-bath.
    Agitate and let the tank sit while you pour fixer into the graduate.
    Pour the tank of stop-bath back into the stop jug and close the cap. Move it to the left or elsewhere.
    Pour fixer into tank.
    Agitate until finished and pour fixer back into fixer jug.

    The key is that you'll only be using a single graduate at any given time (you can use more if you are doing multiple tanks) full of only the same type of substance. Preparing everything out ahead of time can lead to mistakes unless you're absolutely sure of dev vs fixer.

    The *only* step that has any connection to strict time is developer->stop. That's it - and even that is debatable. There's no need to blaze through all the remaining steps as precisely as possible.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Don't prepare all the chemicals before hand. Prepare the *next* chemical as you're doing the current step...
    This is definitely worth repeating and it's my work flow.

  7. #27

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    I don't want to add salt to a wound BUT it's never a good idea to use a new film for something important - even if your disaster could have happened with any film, I think it's always a little stressful to use a new film, and perhaps that messed you up somehow.

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